Nikola Kavaja, intervju sa ubicom

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SherlockHolmes
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Nikola Kavaja, intervju sa ubicom

Post by SherlockHolmes » 17/12/2006 20:42

intresting clanak :D

The Independent wrote: Nikola Kavaja: Interview with an assassin
Nikola Kavaja lives in a drab, Communist-era high-rise in Belgrade, Serbia's crumbling capital. His two-room apartment is sparsely furnished: a single mattress and dresser in one room, and a scratched-up wooden desk, a couch, and a bench press in the other. The white walls are cluttered with pictures of the people who figure most strongly in his personal iconography: General Ratko Mladic, Saint Sava, Hitler, Jimmy Carter, and a young pin-up who is his current girlfriend. Guns and old military gear provide further ornamentation. A blue thermal blanket covers the street window.
By Christopher S Stewart
Published: 10 December 2006

Kavaja is 73, but he looks no older than 60. He adheres to a strict weight-training routine that gets him up every weekday before the sun. He is squarely built and muscular, with white hair cut to a military trim-line and a fighter's mashed-up nose. Except for the fine white thread of moustache, he is cleanly shaven. In his dress, he favours black trousers, black shirts and black combat boots.

Our conversation took place over three mornings, with classical music playing softly in the background. Kavaja spoke slowly and quietly, with an air of determined precision. At times, he paused to place his hand on his forehead in search of a long-forgotten detail. As he spoke, Kavaja stared off in the distance at nothing at all, or else looked down at his booted feet.

Christopher S Stewart You were a Second World War prisoner, a Communist soldier, a CIA hitman, a hijacker, and now a fugitive on the run (among other things). Where to begin?

Nikola Kavaja Write down my name. N-I-K-O-L-A K-A-V-A-J-A. You can call me Nik.

Stewart That's a start.

Kavaja It is a long story. Do you want some schnapps?

Stewart No thanks. I'm fine with water.

Kavaja Water's for pussies.

Stewart Most of the time I'd agree. But 10.30 in the morning is a little early for me to be drinking shots of schnapps.

Kavaja It's a hello. You drink some schnapps with me. We drink together.

Stewart OK.

Kavaja That's better. Salud. So - I was born in Montenegro in 1933. In 1941, when Hitler attacked Yugoslavia, my father and mother and I were all transferred to separate prison camps in Albania. My brothers went to the war. In October 1944, when the Russians forced the Germans out of the Balkans, I went back to Pec to find my mother. But she wasn't there. No one was there. I had to fight for myself. The first time I killed someone was that year - a German soldier. He was heavily wounded and leaning over the top of a well. He was getting water. I walked up to him, took him by the legs and tossed him in like garbage.

Stewart You weren't afraid?

Kavaja My dick, was I ever afraid. I hated them. I couldn't find my family anywhere. I searched for months. Eventually, I found my mother in Vojvodina. I learned that two of my brothers were killed in the war. I joined the air-force academy. They made me a war pilot. Around that time, my brother was thrown in jail for being anti-Communist. He wasn't. But Tito was a suspicious man. Tens of thousands of military officers finished their careers in prison. They all fought for Tito and then they were thrown in jail for bullshit reasons. What kind of leader does that?

Stewart You never liked Tito?

Kavaja I hated him. Around that time, I became a member of an underground anti-Communist group. That's where my life really started. My commander, Milutin Abramovic, was in the air force with me in Sombor. He knew about my brothers who were imprisoned and killed. I had cousins that went to jail too. That's why he started giving me top-secret missions, I think. Because my hatred was so personal.

Stewart What was the first job?

Kavaja He had me paint on the walls of the military barracks "Long live the Soviet Union"; "Down with Tito"; "Down with the Communist Party". It was a test, I think. But I did it. And for me, it was funny - a what-the-fuck kind of thing, you know?

Stewart How did Tito like your sense of humour?

Kavaja When I wrote that, it was Saturday evening. By Sunday morning, military intelligence officers were searching for who did it. There was a huge alarm. There were 4,000 soldiers at our barracks and none of us could leave. After two or three days of investigations, they started to lock people up. They arrested a major who was in charge of security that evening, and he got seven years in prison. Two of my friends were also arrested and sentenced to jail.

Stewart You weren't afraid you'd get caught?

Kavaja Who would have known? I was into football and girls. It made me laugh. The big assignment came next. It was June 1953. The order was to burn the gas tanks at the airport in Sombor. I knew all of those bases like I know my room. My commander gave me some time bombs and I set them up near the tanks, which held a million gallons of petrol. I placed the bombs around the tanks and walked away. When they went off, there was a massive explosion. It was incredible. I was far away but I could see huge yellow flames in the sky. I realised it wasn't a joke anymore. I was in big shit. Police swarmed to the base and all the towns nearby. They arrested hundreds. I knew seven of them. One was a major hero. He got the death penalty. For nothing! The others died in prison.

Stewart You didn't feel guilty at all about this?

Kavaja Guilt? My dick. You don't know about guilt. Schnapps?

Stewart I'm still working on this one, thanks.

Kavaja After my commander was arrested, I was told that a lot of officers were arrested at the airport, and they also asked about me and my friend Sveto. I took my machine gun, a pistol, three grenades, a compass, binoculars, and a bag of clothes, and I became a deserter. That's a very serious thing, punishable by death. I knew they would chase us. Sveto and I decided to cross the border illegally into Austria.

To get to the border, we walked only at night. It wasn't easy terrain. There were mountains and canyons and lots of snow. We slept in the woods. Sveto got so tired he couldn't walk. So I put him on my back. Then we came to this mountain. It was covered in heavy snow, up to my waist in places, and the temperatures were below zero. It would have taken days to go over. But there was a tunnel through the mountain for trains. I decided to take a risk and go through the tunnel. I put Sveto down and he followed. The tunnel was a kilometre long. Sveto kept falling, but I pretended not to see him because I couldn't carry him anymore. Somehow we got through.

Just before we got to the border, there was a canyon. If you made one wrong step you'd fall to your death. The darkness was deep and I couldn't see much. I heard footsteps. I turned and there was a shadow moving along the mountain road. We couldn't run away because we were so tired. I aimed my machine gun in the shadow's direction. It came nearer and I saw that it was a woman. She said to us, "Bless you." She had a hood on, and I pulled back her hood and asked who she was. "I'm a teacher," she said. I asked for her documents. She was telling the truth, so I let her go. I should have killed her because I knew she was going to report us. I don't know why I didn't.

We had trouble at the border. Someone shouted stop. Then there were shots in our direction. We were in open space. Behind us were woods. We got down and fired back. The fight went on for 10 minutes. I went through two clips and threw three hand grenades. But we managed to get back into the woods and retreat to our border. I fired all but seven bullets.

We walked for an hour or so, then tried the border again. That time was worse. We got ambushed from three different directions. It was the Yugoslav People's Army, my own fucking army. They surrounded us, three of them with machine guns. The commander approached and asked where we were going. I reached into my leather jacket and said, "We were just visiting Svatko Lacovic." The commander said, 'There's no one here with that name. Where are your arms?" I said, "We don't have any. I just have gloves." When I took out the gloves, I drew my pistol, put it to his forehead, and pulled the trigger.

Stewart What about the guys with guns?

Kavaja I had seven bullets left. I could have taken them all. But my gun jammed. From behind, I was hit with a machine gun and I lost consciousness. Sveto just stood there. When I came to, there were 20 or so soldiers around.

We were moved to a jail on the border. One morning, they took us out and put us against a wall outside of the barracks. I thought they were going to shoot us. My legs and my hands were in chains. The commander of the division marched out all of the troops - all 5,000 of them - and gave a speech. He said: "From our Communist hands, no one will escape. These men were organising against our nation. We will spit on these traitors." After that, all of them lined up and spat on us, one at a time. One of my cousins came around four times. I couldn't believe it! Five thousand people spat on me. It was a psychological thing, a show to boost morale.

Stewart Pour me some schnapps.

Kavaja I don't want to talk about the trial, about being beaten up every day and every night. I was sentenced to 18 and a half years. After four years I escaped into Austria, where I was picked up and shipped to a US Army base in Stuttgart. They thought I was KGB, but after months of interviews, three intelligence officers introduced themselves and offered me political asylum.

Stewart Is that how you started working for the CIA? How did they ask you to join them?

Kavaja They asked me, my dick. They didn't ask. They checked me out for seven months. They thought I was KGB. I had to prove myself. I bombed some Communist buses - Yugoslavian buses - in Vienna. It was their way of testing my loyalty. They liked me because of my history. I was young and fearless and hated Communism.

So I started to work dirty jobs against Yugoslavia, against Russia - sabotage, spying, exposing double agents, assassinations. I did some very bad things, but I accepted my destiny. In 1959, I uncovered a gang of Yugoslavians smuggling arms to Algeria. They would come in dressed up like priests. I tracked them down and killed them. There were never any reports about the people who disappeared. They might as well have never lived.

Stewart So you were like God, deciding who would and wouldn't die?

Kavaja My superiors made the final decisions. I killed. One person is on my conscience. She was a double agent from East Germany. I was sleeping in the desert in a tent because that was the only place safe from the war. I received an order from military intelligence to kill this woman. When I got her, she didn't know what I was going to do. She was probably 23 years old. I asked for her family name and where she lived. There would be no official report - she would just disappear - and I wanted to send a message to her family and say where they could find her.

Stewart Why her?

Kavaja There was something about her. I just wanted to do her a favour. Even when I was in prison in the United States I dreamt about her. She was not the first one or the last one. But I felt sorry for her. She was so young. But she was a proud girl. She spat on me.

Stewart And you shot her?

Kavaja What do you think? I didn't rape her. I told her to walk ahead of me. And I shot her in the back.

Stewart Did you think she deserved that?

Kavaja I never worried about killing an innocent person. I wasn't trained to kill innocent people. I killed people on my level - soldier to soldier, agent to agent. It is not my job to think about innocence or guilt. She didn't ask for mercy. She was probably guilty. But she stays with me. No one else does.

Stewart How were you paid?

Kavaja By the job. For the bigger jobs, like assassinating Tito, I would be paid US$15,000. For most jobs, US$10,000. They dropped the money off at my house.

Stewart You didn't assassinate Tito - but you tried?

Kavaja Killing Tito was a big mission. For almost a decade, I hunted him. I was never a traitor - I wanted to save my country. That's why I was good for this mission. I was ready to give my life for it. If I died one second after I killed Tito I wouldn't care. He killed my three brothers. He destroyed my country. I went to jail. I lost everything.

In 1963 I got information that Tito was coming to North and South America for a tour. Our intelligence said it would be easier to kill him in South America because the security would be much thinner down there. Tito always travelled with his own agents, about 125 State Security Service men. These men went a few months in advance to clean up all the political dissidents. When I say clean up, I mean jail or kill. They had files on these people. Of course, they had a big file on me, too. The government wanted me dead. The State Security Service sent people to try to assassinate me. When I returned to Serbia in the 1990s, a Montenegrin man came and said to me, I was supposed to kill you in 1976 in the States, but I couldn't find you. We laughed about it.

Anyway, to kill Tito, I worked with Dragica Kacikovic and a third Serbian guy that I won't name because he is still undercover. We weren't maniacs. We didn't just decide, "Hey, we're going to go kill Tito." We got our orders from the CIA and planned it out carefully.

Rio de Janeiro was our first shot. Dragica went first. He got fake documents and travelled as a Mexican journalist with a sombrero and a video camera. I followed with the third guy. I took a Colt .45 and a .357 Magnum and I was disguised as a Catholic priest - with a long black robe and a black hat.

We had informants in the town who provided us with information. We knew Tito liked to go out on the town, eat, and see chicks. I waited for word that he was out on the town and then I would shoot him. But Brazil was not our time. Tito stayed in the house throughout his stay. He didn't move from the building for two days. We didn't see him come and we didn't see him go. One day he was there and then he was gone. Like a ghost.

Stewart Was that a major letdown for you?

Kavaja I didn't panic. From Brazil, I followed him to Santiago, Chile, then Mexico City. Then I got a message to come to Washington DC right away, because Tito was on his way. That was the most dangerous place for us as a group. The FBI was searching for us. They were working with the Yugoslav State Security Service.

Stewart I thought you worked with the CIA?

Kavaja But the CIA and the FBI didn't share informants. They were rival organisations. There were rewards for our capture from the FBI. My last attempt to kill him was 1971 at Camp David in Maryland. He was going there to visit Richard Nixon. No one can carry a gun around Camp David, but I went alone, dressed as a Maryland State Trooper. I couldn't get on the actual property, but I got up into a tree where I could see the chopper with binoculars. I had my sniper rifle with me. My thought was that at some point Tito would take a walk into the woods. He liked to take walks. It was beautiful, I thought. Who wouldn't take a walk? I waited all day and night.

Stewart In the tree? You didn't sleep?

Kavaja No. I couldn't kill him if I was asleep. You don't know anything about this kind of thing. Sleep! What a fucking joker.

Stewart Did Tito ever go for a walk?

Kavaja Never. After two days, he left. And that was it. Nothing. So I didn't get him. But I did a lot of damage to his regime and to Communism.

Stewart You had a Serbian terrorist organisation didn't you?

Kavaja It was a freedom group. I called it Freedom for the Serbian Fatherland - Sopo. We got money from the CIA. We bombed the Yugoslav embassies in Washington and Ottawa, and the consulates in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Toronto. Bin Laden stole our strategies. But after that the State Department got a lot of pressure from Tito to track us down and extradite us. It was a big mess.

Stewart Did they catch up with you?

Kavaja Not until 1978. I was in New York on my way to a friend's house and more than 20 agents with guns ambushed me on

Third Avenue. They arrested over a hundred of us. A judge in Chicago found us guilty but delayed the sentencing for a month. I got out on $250,000 bail. The judge released everyone except for Stojilko Kajevic, who went by the name Priest. He helped me lead Sopo. The FBI thought he was the most dangerous. That was a mistake. After the trial I told Priest that I was ready to do a hijacking I'd been talking about. My plan was to land in Chicago, pick Priest up, and then fly to Belgrade and crash into the Communist Central Committee building.

Stewart So that's what you did when you got out on bail - hijacked a plane?

Kavaja First I returned home to see my family. One day I got a call from Priest. He said, "Send me the memorandum." I said, "For whom?" "President Carter," he said. That night, I went into my basement, where I made bombs. I made two of them built into two beer bottles. The telephone rang - this is funny - it was an FBI agent from Chicago, Al King. He said, "Hi Nik, how are you?" I told him, "I'm making a bomb for tomorrow." He thought I was joking. It was a big scandal in the trial later on. You can check the court files. It's all there. After I finished, I went upstairs. I took some long socks from my daughter's room and stuffed the bottles in my trouser legs. I put on my trousers and looked in the mirror and you couldn't see that anything was in there. I was ready. I went to sleep at around 1am.

Stewart How could you sleep?

Kavaja I had done a hundred more difficult operations. I never feared that I would make a mistake. I woke up at five, just like any other day. My wife woke up with me. She cooked me a steak for breakfast. That's all I eat - steaks. I said goodbye like any other morning. I had the bombs strapped to my leg and dynamite in a leather suitcase. A cab took me to the airport. I ordered a brandy at the airport bar and relaxed. I checked in and waited by security for the right moment to pass. I knew if a police officer stopped me, I would have to kill him. I was going to get on that plane. That's all that was on my mind. I saw an albino couple with a lot of camping equipment passing through security. So I went with them. They set the alarm off. The police stopped them, but not me.

I got on the plane to Chicago. It was an American Airlines 727. My seat was number 23 on the left side of the plane. Next to me was a woman from Poland who had never been to the United States. Imagine that. She has to get on my plane! We drank a brandy together. We talked. Fifteen minutes before we landed, I said goodbye to the her and went to the bathroom.

I got the bombs ready, then went to the cockpit. The stewardess asked me what I needed. I said, "Give me the key to the cabin." She was paralysed. I put my hand in her pocket, took the key, and opened the cabin. There were four pilots. They didn't hear me open the door. When one of them tried to stand up, I forced him down. His name was Mitchell. I showed them the explosives and said, "This is my plane now, I am responsible for your lives, if you make a mistake, we will all go to God."

After a few minutes, Mitchell asked me what I wanted - money or what? I told him to get me in touch with the FBI. Al King got on the line. He was absolutely crazy! He said, "Nik, you're late for court." I said, "Listen, in five minutes I'm going to fly over the courthouse. I told you last night that I was making bombs." He said, "Why do you make jokes?" I said, "You'll see me in five minutes."

I flew over the courthouse three or four times. The stewardess brought me a brandy. Eventually, we landed and I parked the plane at the far edge of the airport. There were 128 passengers and eight crew members. Hundreds of police surrounded the plane on the runway. The FBI asked me what I wanted. I said, "I want Priest." Passengers kept asking for things. One woman said she was going to give birth and I said, "What the fuck is going on? I'm not a doctor, I'm a terrorist."

The FBI sent a lawyer out to the plane to talk me out of it, but I said it was too late. Then he begged me to release the passengers. That was the riskiest moment. I worried that the FBI would attack. But I had the bomb trigger in hand and I told them not to mess around because I could blow the plane up in a second. The briefcase of dynamite was at my chest. I gave the passengers five minutes to get off. You should have seen these fat Negroes! It was hilarious. Looking at them you wouldn't expect them to be so fast. But they were off in seconds. At the end there were four people left: Mitchell, a co-pilot, my lawyer, and the stewardess.

Stewart What about Priest?

Kavaja Priest finally called me. But it wasn't good. He said, "Brother Nikola, I'm not coming with you." That was the most difficult moment. I sacrificed everything for this, my wife, my kids, my life. We had a deal. We were going to take the plane to Yugoslavia. It was his job to show me the building we were going to hit. I hadn't been back to Yugoslavia for decades. The Communist Central Committee building was built in the 1960s. I didn't know the land. I didn't know what to do at that point. But he got off the phone and it was over.

I told them to fuel the plane and then I told Mitchell we were leaving. There were 40 or 50 cars following the plane as we drove down the runway. Mitchell asked me what the plan was and I said, "New York." On the way, I demanded a 707, a much bigger plane, and a new crew to meet me at JFK. No one knew what I was going to do. When we landed, the 707 was there. We pulled up. I took Mitchell and the co-pilot and tied them to me. I wanted to make sure I didn't get killed on the way across and that the new pilots were not impostors. There were hundreds of police snipers. But I had this living wall around me.

After we left New York, I finally told my lawyer the plan. You should have seen his eyes. He was a baby. We flew for hours. But then I had second thoughts. I was ready to die. But I didn't know where the Central Communist building was in Belgrade. I didn't want to kill regular civilians. That was never my job. I wanted to kill Tito and the biggest symbol of the Communist Party - not go down as the guy who killed innocent people. My friend betrayed me and I lost the target.

Stewart So you're up there with a stolen 707, a bunch of hostages, and nowhere to go.

Kavaja I didn't want to lose my life for nothing. That was the point. But you don't have time to think. My lawyer said that Ireland didn't have an extradition agreement with the United States. I'd get political asylum, I'd be safe. So we landed there. I gave up the explosives and let everyone go. Then the negotiations started between the authorities of Ireland, my lawyer, and the States. Of course, they all betrayed me. Ireland sent me back to the US. That was it. This time it was over for real.

I was in prison from 1979 to 1997. First, I went to Marion prison in Illinois. Solitary confinement. Noriega was in the same place. I never left my cell. I had three shirts, three pairs of trousers, three towels, and two blankets from like World War One. I had a mouse friend who visited me at night. There was no regular toilet - it was in the floor and you had to be a good pilot to get everything in there. I did push-ups - thousands of them a day - and thought about my wife and kids, and I thought about Tito.

Stewart After 20 years, they let you out.

Kavaja Yeah. It was a long time. And I'm on parole until 2019.

Stewart So how did you get back to Serbia?

Kavaja I'm supposed to be in the States. But I left. I didn't ask anybody. Now I can't go back or they'd send me to prison. I can't see my wife or kids. I went to Mexico and then Brazil and then South Africa. From there, I went to Athens, then Serbia.

Stewart How were you treated when you returned to Serbia?

Kavaja I had a reception at a military bunker in the mountains. It was early 1999, when Kosovo was going on. They were cooking mushrooms. That shit's not for me. I only eat steak. I told them, "We need to fight on their territory. Let's go to Albania and Macedonia and fight the Albanians that way. That's the only way we are going to win." They didn't listen. A few months later, they bombed Belgrade. And the war was over.

Stewart Do you have enemies?

Kavaja I have lots of enemies - ex-Communists, State Security Service from Tito's day - but I'm not afraid. I have protection. And I can take care of myself. If someone wanted to assassinate me, I know how they'd do it because I was an assassin myself. See this? This is my best friend in all my life. It's a German gun from before World War Two, made in 1938. A Luger 9mm. Very good gun.

Stewart Is it loaded?

Kavaja Not right now.

Stewart What's the point of having a gun under your table if it's not loaded?

Kavaja You know nothing about guns! There are bullets in it, but they aren't engaged. I can engage it in a second. My dick. You're a silly man!

Stewart So you're still ready to fight?

Kavaja I'm still strong. I work out every day except Saturday and Sunday. My hands are scarred from explosives, but I can still get down on the floor and do push-ups. I do 200 push-ups, squats, like this, off the side of bed. At one time, I could do 3,000.

Stewart How many people have you killed so far?

Kavaja There are so many things that I can't even tell you. How many I killed is not important. I count to 17 and then stop counting.

Stewart Seventeen?

Kavaja It's just a number. My first kill was when I was 14 and my last was, I don't know, maybe in 1976. But I'm not going to talk about that. I probably shouldn't have said a lot of the things I said. I have my wife and kids in the United States still.

Stewart What does it feel like to assassinate someone?

Kavaja What the fuck?

Stewart After such an extreme life, it must be hard to settle down and call it quits?

Kavaja It's not over. I still fuck good. I've got a couple of young girls. You see this one here? Her tits! Her hair! I also have other jobs to do, but we won't talk about that. I have money and girls and that's a good life for me. I've got a house in Montenegro, a big apartment in Novi Sad. I got this apartment in Belgrade. I'm set up.

Stewart I see pictures on your wall of Hitler, Stalin, and Mussolini. Are they idols?

Kavaja These are big men.

Stewart And big murderers.

Kavaja American presidents killed too.

Stewart How do you think you'll be remembered?

Kavaja Evil.

Christopher S Stewart is writing a book on the Serbian warlord Arkan, published next year. This interview originally appeared in 'The Paris Review'. A new collection, 'The Paris Review Interviews, Vol 1', is published by Canongate on 18 January, priced £14.99

Kavaja is 73, but he looks no older than 60. He adheres to a strict weight-training routine that gets him up every weekday before the sun. He is squarely built and muscular, with white hair cut to a military trim-line and a fighter's mashed-up nose. Except for the fine white thread of moustache, he is cleanly shaven. In his dress, he favours black trousers, black shirts and black combat boots.

Our conversation took place over three mornings, with classical music playing softly in the background. Kavaja spoke slowly and quietly, with an air of determined precision. At times, he paused to place his hand on his forehead in search of a long-forgotten detail. As he spoke, Kavaja stared off in the distance at nothing at all, or else looked down at his booted feet.

Christopher S Stewart You were a Second World War prisoner, a Communist soldier, a CIA hitman, a hijacker, and now a fugitive on the run (among other things). Where to begin?

Nikola Kavaja Write down my name. N-I-K-O-L-A K-A-V-A-J-A. You can call me Nik.

Stewart That's a start.

Kavaja It is a long story. Do you want some schnapps?

Stewart No thanks. I'm fine with water.

Kavaja Water's for pussies.

Stewart Most of the time I'd agree. But 10.30 in the morning is a little early for me to be drinking shots of schnapps.

Kavaja It's a hello. You drink some schnapps with me. We drink together.

Stewart OK.

Kavaja That's better. Salud. So - I was born in Montenegro in 1933. In 1941, when Hitler attacked Yugoslavia, my father and mother and I were all transferred to separate prison camps in Albania. My brothers went to the war. In October 1944, when the Russians forced the Germans out of the Balkans, I went back to Pec to find my mother. But she wasn't there. No one was there. I had to fight for myself. The first time I killed someone was that year - a German soldier. He was heavily wounded and leaning over the top of a well. He was getting water. I walked up to him, took him by the legs and tossed him in like garbage.

Stewart You weren't afraid?

Kavaja My dick, was I ever afraid. I hated them. I couldn't find my family anywhere. I searched for months. Eventually, I found my mother in Vojvodina. I learned that two of my brothers were killed in the war. I joined the air-force academy. They made me a war pilot. Around that time, my brother was thrown in jail for being anti-Communist. He wasn't. But Tito was a suspicious man. Tens of thousands of military officers finished their careers in prison. They all fought for Tito and then they were thrown in jail for bullshit reasons. What kind of leader does that?

Stewart You never liked Tito?

Kavaja I hated him. Around that time, I became a member of an underground anti-Communist group. That's where my life really started. My commander, Milutin Abramovic, was in the air force with me in Sombor. He knew about my brothers who were imprisoned and killed. I had cousins that went to jail too. That's why he started giving me top-secret missions, I think. Because my hatred was so personal.

Stewart What was the first job?

Kavaja He had me paint on the walls of the military barracks "Long live the Soviet Union"; "Down with Tito"; "Down with the Communist Party". It was a test, I think. But I did it. And for me, it was funny - a what-the-fuck kind of thing, you know?

Stewart How did Tito like your sense of humour?

Kavaja When I wrote that, it was Saturday evening. By Sunday morning, military intelligence officers were searching for who did it. There was a huge alarm. There were 4,000 soldiers at our barracks and none of us could leave. After two or three days of investigations, they started to lock people up. They arrested a major who was in charge of security that evening, and he got seven years in prison. Two of my friends were also arrested and sentenced to jail.

Stewart You weren't afraid you'd get caught?

Kavaja Who would have known? I was into football and girls. It made me laugh. The big assignment came next. It was June 1953. The order was to burn the gas tanks at the airport in Sombor. I knew all of those bases like I know my room. My commander gave me some time bombs and I set them up near the tanks, which held a million gallons of petrol. I placed the bombs around the tanks and walked away. When they went off, there was a massive explosion. It was incredible. I was far away but I could see huge yellow flames in the sky. I realised it wasn't a joke anymore. I was in big shit. Police swarmed to the base and all the towns nearby. They arrested hundreds. I knew seven of them. One was a major hero. He got the death penalty. For nothing! The others died in prison.

Stewart You didn't feel guilty at all about this?

Kavaja Guilt? My dick. You don't know about guilt. Schnapps?

Stewart I'm still working on this one, thanks.

Kavaja After my commander was arrested, I was told that a lot of officers were arrested at the airport, and they also asked about me and my friend Sveto. I took my machine gun, a pistol, three grenades, a compass, binoculars, and a bag of clothes, and I became a deserter. That's a very serious thing, punishable by death. I knew they would chase us. Sveto and I decided to cross the border illegally into Austria.

To get to the border, we walked only at night. It wasn't easy terrain. There were mountains and canyons and lots of snow. We slept in the woods. Sveto got so tired he couldn't walk. So I put him on my back. Then we came to this mountain. It was covered in heavy snow, up to my waist in places, and the temperatures were below zero. It would have taken days to go over. But there was a tunnel through the mountain for trains. I decided to take a risk and go through the tunnel. I put Sveto down and he followed. The tunnel was a kilometre long. Sveto kept falling, but I pretended not to see him because I couldn't carry him anymore. Somehow we got through.

Just before we got to the border, there was a canyon. If you made one wrong step you'd fall to your death. The darkness was deep and I couldn't see much. I heard footsteps. I turned and there was a shadow moving along the mountain road. We couldn't run away because we were so tired. I aimed my machine gun in the shadow's direction. It came nearer and I saw that it was a woman. She said to us, "Bless you." She had a hood on, and I pulled back her hood and asked who she was. "I'm a teacher," she said. I asked for her documents. She was telling the truth, so I let her go. I should have killed her because I knew she was going to report us. I don't know why I didn't.

We had trouble at the border. Someone shouted stop. Then there were shots in our direction. We were in open space. Behind us were woods. We got down and fired back. The fight went on for 10 minutes. I went through two clips and threw three hand grenades. But we managed to get back into the woods and retreat to our border. I fired all but seven bullets.

We walked for an hour or so, then tried the border again. That time was worse. We got ambushed from three different directions. It was the Yugoslav People's Army, my own fucking army. They surrounded us, three of them with machine guns. The commander approached and asked where we were going. I reached into my leather jacket and said, "We were just visiting Svatko Lacovic." The commander said, 'There's no one here with that name. Where are your arms?" I said, "We don't have any. I just have gloves." When I took out the gloves, I drew my pistol, put it to his forehead, and pulled the trigger.

Stewart What about the guys with guns?

Kavaja I had seven bullets left. I could have taken them all. But my gun jammed. From behind, I was hit with a machine gun and I lost consciousness. Sveto just stood there. When I came to, there were 20 or so soldiers around.

We were moved to a jail on the border. One morning, they took us out and put us against a wall outside of the barracks. I thought they were going to shoot us. My legs and my hands were in chains. The commander of the division marched out all of the troops - all 5,000 of them - and gave a speech. He said: "From our Communist hands, no one will escape. These men were organising against our nation. We will spit on these traitors." After that, all of them lined up and spat on us, one at a time. One of my cousins came around four times. I couldn't believe it! Five thousand people spat on me. It was a psychological thing, a show to boost morale.

Stewart Pour me some schnapps.

Kavaja I don't want to talk about the trial, about being beaten up every day and every night. I was sentenced to 18 and a half years. After four years I escaped into Austria, where I was picked up and shipped to a US Army base in Stuttgart. They thought I was KGB, but after months of interviews, three intelligence officers introduced themselves and offered me political asylum.

Stewart Is that how you started working for the CIA? How did they ask you to join them?

Kavaja They asked me, my dick. They didn't ask. They checked me out for seven months. They thought I was KGB. I had to prove myself. I bombed some Communist buses - Yugoslavian buses - in Vienna. It was their way of testing my loyalty. They liked me because of my history. I was young and fearless and hated Communism.

So I started to work dirty jobs against Yugoslavia, against Russia - sabotage, spying, exposing double agents, assassinations. I did some very bad things, but I accepted my destiny. In 1959, I uncovered a gang of Yugoslavians smuggling arms to Algeria. They would come in dressed up like priests. I tracked them down and killed them. There were never any reports about the people who disappeared. They might as well have never lived.

Stewart So you were like God, deciding who would and wouldn't die?

Kavaja My superiors made the final decisions. I killed. One person is on my conscience. She was a double agent from East Germany. I was sleeping in the desert in a tent because that was the only place safe from the war. I received an order from military intelligence to kill this woman. When I got her, she didn't know what I was going to do. She was probably 23 years old. I asked for her family name and where she lived. There would be no official report - she would just disappear - and I wanted to send a message to her family and say where they could find her.

Stewart Why her?

Kavaja There was something about her. I just wanted to do her a favour. Even when I was in prison in the United States I dreamt about her. She was not the first one or the last one. But I felt sorry for her. She was so young. But she was a proud girl. She spat on me.

Stewart And you shot her?

Kavaja What do you think? I didn't rape her. I told her to walk ahead of me. And I shot her in the back.

Stewart Did you think she deserved that?

Kavaja I never worried about killing an innocent person. I wasn't trained to kill innocent people. I killed people on my level - soldier to soldier, agent to agent. It is not my job to think about innocence or guilt. She didn't ask for mercy. She was probably guilty. But she stays with me. No one else does.

Stewart How were you paid?

Kavaja By the job. For the bigger jobs, like assassinating Tito, I would be paid US$15,000. For most jobs, US$10,000. They dropped the money off at my house.

Stewart You didn't assassinate Tito - but you tried?

Kavaja Killing Tito was a big mission. For almost a decade, I hunted him. I was never a traitor - I wanted to save my country. That's why I was good for this mission. I was ready to give my life for it. If I died one second after I killed Tito I wouldn't care. He killed my three brothers. He destroyed my country. I went to jail. I lost everything.

In 1963 I got information that Tito was coming to North and South America for a tour. Our intelligence said it would be easier to kill him in South America because the security would be much thinner down there. Tito always travelled with his own agents, about 125 State Security Service men. These men went a few months in advance to clean up all the political dissidents. When I say clean up, I mean jail or kill. They had files on these people. Of course, they had a big file on me, too. The government wanted me dead. The State Security Service sent people to try to assassinate me. When I returned to Serbia in the 1990s, a Montenegrin man came and said to me, I was supposed to kill you in 1976 in the States, but I couldn't find you. We laughed about it.

Anyway, to kill Tito, I worked with Dragica Kacikovic and a third Serbian guy that I won't name because he is still undercover. We weren't maniacs. We didn't just decide, "Hey, we're going to go kill Tito." We got our orders from the CIA and planned it out carefully.

Rio de Janeiro was our first shot. Dragica went first. He got fake documents and travelled as a Mexican journalist with a sombrero and a video camera. I followed with the third guy. I took a Colt .45 and a .357 Magnum and I was disguised as a Catholic priest - with a long black robe and a black hat.

We had informants in the town who provided us with information. We knew Tito liked to go out on the town, eat, and see chicks. I waited for word that he was out on the town and then I would shoot him. But Brazil was not our time. Tito stayed in the house throughout his stay. He didn't move from the building for two days. We didn't see him come and we didn't see him go. One day he was there and then he was gone. Like a ghost.


Ovo je samo prva polovina, citav clanak na

http://news.independent.co.uk/people/profiles/article2055456.ece


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Post by muha_sa » 17/12/2006 20:46

pa dragi šerlok--jel ovo samo za one koji znaju engleski?

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Post by Fair Life » 17/12/2006 20:52

BEOGRAD - Nikola Kavaja (70), poznat po planiranju atentata na Josipa Broza Tita, uhapšen je 1. aprila u akciji "Sablja", saznaje "Glas javnosti". I u Vladi Srbije "Glasu" je potvrđeno da je Kavaja pre nekoliko dana uhapšen, ali nije saopšteno zbog čega je priveden na informativni razgovor.
U javnosti su se čule špekulacije da je uhapšen zbog mogućih veza sa grupom Željka Maksimovića Make za kojim je raspisana poternica zbog organizovanja atentata na policijskog generala Boška Buhu, kao i planiranih ubistva političara iz vlasti, ali i opozicije.
Pretpostavlja se da je priveden i zbog kumovskih veza sa Boškom Radonjićem, biznismenom i vlasnikom "Lotos bara" koji je uhapšen posle atentata na premijera Zorana Đinđića. Kavaju su, kako "Glas" saznaje, uhapsili pripadnici vojne policije i sproveli u vojni istražni zatvor u Ustaničkoj ulici u Beogradu.
Kavaja je rodom iz Knina, ali je većinu života proveo u Americi. Početkom šezdesetih, Američki federalni biro (FBI) ga je uhapsio pod sumnjom da je učestvovao u planiranju atentata na Tita. Zbog toga je bio osuđen na višegodišnju robiju koju je izdržavao u zatvoru u Čikagu.
U Jugoslaviju se vratio krajem devedesetih. Nastavio je da održava veze sa srpskom dijasporom i uvek se deklarisao kao "nesumnjivi srpski patriota".

Image
Nikola Kavaja

Intervju s Nikolom Kavajom objavljen je u ovoljetnom broju uglednog američkog književnog časopisa The Paris Review. Christopher S. Stewart, koji inače piše za New York Times Magazine, GQ i Weird, otišao je u Beograd i razgovarao s čovjekom koji je bio jedan od najpoznatijih i najopasnijih srpskih emigrantskih terorista i ubojica. Kavaja je bio poznat kao dugogodišnji lovac na Tita, agent koji je radio za srpske emigrantske organizacije, a neke kao Srpski oslobodilački pokret Otadžbina (SOPO) i osnovao, obučavala ga je i plaćala CIA, a vjerojatno je radio i za KGB. Iz Jugoslavije je nakon diverzantskih akcija pobjegao već pedesetih godina, kao izučeni vojni pilot i nastanio se u SAD gdje je uspješno izmicao potjerama FBI-a. Bavio se pretežno likvidacijama i bombaškim napadima, a konačno je uhićen tek 1979. nakon što je oteo američki avion u namjeri da preleti Atlantik i zabije se u zgradu Centralnog komiteta KPJ u Beogradu. Osuđen je na 65 godina zatvora, ali je uvjetno pušten 1997. nakon čega je pobjegao u Srbiju, gdje i danas živi.

Autor intervjua Christopher S. Stewart trenutačno radi na knjizi o ništa manje poznatom srpskom gangsteru i ratnom zločincu Željku Ražnjatoviću Arkanu. (Saša Drach) wrote:
Nikola Kavaja: 'Ja sam čovjek kojeg će svijet pamtiti po zlu!'

Piše: Christopher S. Stewart

• Čudim se da FBI nije vašem odvjetniku dao pištolj da vas savlada. Jeste li ga pretražili?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: To bi bilo prvi put u povijesti Sjedinjenih Država da je odvjetnik ubio vlastitog klijenta. Jebi ga! Kad je došao, probao me odgovoriti, ali rekao sam mu da je tada bilo kasno. Onda me počeo preklinjati da pustim putnike.

To je bio najriskantiji trenutak za mene. Bojao sam se da će FBI napasti. No rekao sam im da mi je okidač za bombe u ruci i da ne petljaju oko aviona, jer ću u sekundi raznijeti avion. Na grudima mi je bila hrpa dinamita iz aktovke. Dao sam putnicima pet minuta da napuste avion. Trebao si vidjeti one debele crnčuge! Užasno su bili smiješni. Ne bi čovjek rekao da se onako debeli mogu tako brzo kretati. Nestali su za par sekundi.

Na kraju su ostala samo četvorica: pilot Mitchell, kopilot, moj odvjetnik i pratilac leta. Walter Cronkite je te večeri na vijestima rekao kako im taj momak stvara velike probleme. Sljedeći je dan to bilo po svim novinama - New York Times, Los Angeles Times.

• Što je bilo s Popom?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Pop me na kraju nazvao. Ali to je bilo loše. Rekao mi je: 'Brate Nikola, neću poći s tobom.' To mi je bio najteži trenutak. Sve sam žrtvovao za to. Dogovorili smo se. Avionom do Jugoslavije. Njegov je posao bio da mi pokaže zgradu koju moramo udariti. Ja u Jugoslaviji nisam bio desetljećima. Zgrada CK KPJ bila je sagrađena 1964. Nisam poznavao konfiguraciju tla. I tada nisam znao što da napravim. Tada je on prekinuo liniju i to je bilo gotovo.

• I dalje ste imali svoj plan.

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Morao sam donijeti odluku. Rekao sam im da napune avion gorivom i rekao Mitchellu da polazimo. Dok smo rulali po pisti, pratilo nas je četrdeset ili pedeset policijskih automobila. Mitchell me pitao kakav je plan i ja mu rekoh: 'New York'. Na putu do tamo tražio sam 707, puno veći avion i novu posadu da me čekaju na aerodrom JFK. Nitko nije znao što smjeram. Kad smo sletjeli, 707 je već bio tamo. Došli smo mu sasvim blizu. Mitchella i kopilota sam privezao za sebe. Bili su viši od mene. Htio sam biti siguran da me neće moći ubiti i da novi piloti nisu podmetnuti policajci. Tko zna koliko je bilo policijskih snajpera. No oko mene je bio živi zid.

Kad smo ušli u drugi avion, vidio sam tamo trojicu koji su sjedili kao mumije. Jednog od njih sam lupio po ramenu da se digne. Bio je mojih godina. Rekao mi je: 'Ja sam pukovnik američkog zrakoplovstva, oženjen sam dvadeset pet godina i ovdje sam da vas odvedem kamo god treba. Ali molim vas, nemojte nikoga ozlijediti. Oprostio sam se s Mitchellom i onim drugim pilotom.

Napustili smo New York. Konačno sam rekao odvjetniku svoj plan. Trebao si mu vidjeti izraz u očima. Bio je kao beba. Satima smo letjeli, no meni su se motale svakojake misli. Ja sam bio spreman umrijeti, ali nisam znao gdje je ta zgrada Centralnog komiteta u Beogradu. Nisam htio ubijati obične civile. To mi nikad nije bio posao. Htio sam ubiti Tita i uništiti najveći simbol Komunističke partije - a ne da me pamte kao tipa koji je pobio nedužne civile. Moj me drug izdao i ja više nisam imao metu.

• Znači našli ste se u kidnapiranom avionu s taocima, ali bez ideje kamo dalje.

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Nisam htio dati život ni za što. U tome je bila stvar. No tu nije bilo puno vremena za razmišljanje. Moj odvjetnik mi je rekao da Irska nema dogovor o ekstradikciji s Amerikom i da bih mogao dobiti politički azil i tako se izvući. Tako smo tamo sletjeli. Maknuo sam eksplozive i pustio taoce. Onda su počeli pregovori mog odvjetnika, irskih vlasti i Amerikanaca. Naravno, svi su me izigrali. Irska me vratila natrag u Sjedinjene Države. I to je bilo to. Taj je put situacija bila sasvim ozbiljna.

Na sudu u Chicagu svjedočio je jedan od pilota iz 707. Bilo mi je to smiješno. Mislio sam da u avionu nije bilo agenata. Kad smo bili iznad Atlantika, taj me momak pitao da li bih htio pojesti šniclu. U sekundi mi je prošlo kroz glavu da je policajac, jer kako inače zna da volim šnicle? Pretražio sam ga, ali nisam mu ništa našao. Na suđenju je rekao da je agent, a kad ga je sudac pitao gdje je sakrio oružje, rekao mu je da je bilo uz šniclu. Kad ga je sudac pitao zašto me nije ubio, odgovorio mu je: 'Zato što nisam heroj'.

Suđenje je završilo nekoliko tjedana prije Božića 1979. Dobio sam četrdeset godina zbog terorizma, prenošenja eksploziva, otmice aviona i pokušaja da ubijem Tita.

• Duga kazna.

NIKOLA KAVAJA: U zatvoru sam bio od 1979. do 1997. Prvo sam bio u zatvoru Marion u Illiniosu, u samici. Noriega je bio tamo u isto to vrijeme. Na svakom je katu bilo osamnaest ćelija. Svaka druga ćelija je bila prazna kako ne bismo mogli razgovarati kroz zidove. Čamio sam u toj ćeliji koja je bila topla i zagušljiva kao usred ljeta, ali kroz cijelu godinu. Tamo ne brojiš ni dane, ni mjesece, samo godine. Niti jednom nisam napustio svoju ćeliju. Imao sam tri košulje, tri para hlača, tri ručnika i dva pokrivača iz, recimo Prvog svjetskog rata. Noću me posjećivao prijatelj, jedan miš. Nije bilo nikakvog normalnog klozeta. Samo rupa u podu i morao si biti jako dobar pilot da tamo baš sve smjestiš. Kad si to htio isprati, morao si pozvati stražara, ali on bi se, naravno, izderao natrag, jebo ti majku. Tako se to nikad nije ispiralo. Samo se gomilalo i smrdilo. Nisam baš puno jeo. A i kad jesam, to je bilo kao da žvačeš sendviče i ribu iz Prvog svjetskog rata. Radio sam puno sklekova. Oko tisuću na dan, mislio na ženu i djecu i mislio na Tita.

Onda su me prebacili iz Mariona u Lampoc, u Kaliforniju. Tada me CIA ponovo počela posjećivati.

• Što su htjeli?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Počeo je građanski rat u Jugoslaviji, pa su me 1991. pitali da li bismo mogli nastaviti tamo gdje smo prekinuli. Znali su da se tamo bore i neki moji drugovi. Rekao sam im da si jebu mater: 'Uništili ste mi obitelje, izdali ste me.' No oni su i dalje dolazili i pitali hoću li raditi za njih. Zadnji put su bili do mene, tek prije nego što sam izišao. Tada su me prebacili u Oakdale, u Luisianu, u još jedan od najstrože čuvanih zatvora. Došlo ih je četiri-pet. Jedan od njih se čak htio sa mnom rukovati. Nisam mu pružio ruku.

• Pustili su vas nakon dvadeset godina?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Da. Dugo je to vrijeme. No pušten sam uvjetno do 2019.

• Kako ste se onda vratili u Srbiju?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Trebao sam cijelo vrijeme biti u Sjedinjenim Državama, ali sam otišao. Nikoga nisam ništa pitao. Sada se više tamo ni ne mogu vratiti, jer bi me odmah strpali u zatvor. Ne mogu vidjeti ni ženu ni djecu. Bio sam u Meksiku, Brazilu i Južnoj Africi. Od tamo sam došao u Atenu i onda u Srbiju. Iz zatvora sam pisao Ratku Mladiću i davao mu instrukcije. Pisma sam slao preko svog odvjetnika - a on nije znao što je u njima. Govorio sam Mladiću kako da se bori protiv Muslimana. Rekao sam mu i da bude što bliže mirovnim snagama. Rekao sam mu 1995. da pohvata mirovanjake i da ih povješa po banderama. U to vrijeme im je NATO prijetio bombardiranjem. Moj kurac. Da me Mladić poslušao, NATO nikad ne bi bombardirao Jugoslaviju.

• Htjeli ste da linčuje mirovnjake?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Da pokažem našu snagu. Da ih upozorim da nam se ne približavaju. U glavi sam već vidio bombardiranje Beograda. Bombardirat će te najjače zrakoplovstvo na svijetu. To možeš očekivati. Možeš se boriti protiv njih na njihovom teritoriju, ali nikada na svom. To sam im napisao. Ali Mladić me nije htio slušati i NATO ih bombardirao.

• Kako su se odnosili prema vama kad ste se vratili u Srbiju?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Primili su me u vojnom bunkeru u planinama. Bila je to rana 1999. godina kada je u toku bio rat na Kosovu. Spremali su gljive. To sranje nije za mene. Ja jedem samo meso. Te sam si večeri ispekao debelu šniclu. I rekao sam im: 'Moramo se boriti na njihovom teritoriju. Hajdemo u Albaniju i Makedoniju i tamo će se boriti protiv Albanaca. Samo ih tako možemo pobijediti.' Nisu me htjeli slušati.

• Imate li još uvijek neprijatelja?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Imam puno neprijatelja - bivši komunisti, ljudi iz Države bezbednosti iz Titovih dana - ali ja ih se ne bojim. Imam zaštitu, a i znam se sam brinuti za sebe. Kad bi me netko želio ubiti, znam kako bi to izveo, jer sam i ja bio ubojica. Mogu ih ustrijeliti pištoljem ili ih mogu gurnuti ako se pokušaju popeti do mog stana. Na prozorima imam rešetke kao u Marionu, a stanujem visoko u ovoj zgradi. Ulazna vrata su metalna. Vidiš ovo? To mi je najbolji prijatelj cijelog života. Njemački pištolj iz vremena prije Drugog svjetskog rata, napravljen još 1938. Luger, 8 mm. Jako dobar pištolj.

• Je li nabijen?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Sada nije.

• Kakve koristi od toga da držite pod stolom prazan pištolj?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Ti izgleda ništa ne znaš o oružju. Šaržer je pun, ali metak nije u cijevi. Mogu ga repetirati u tik sekunde. Onda je to nabijen pištolj. Ovaj sam pitštolj dobio kad sam završio školu u Srbiji. Dali su mi ga moji roditelji.

• Jeste li ga kada koristili?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Pa, naravno! Zašto bih ga inače imao? Kakvo pitanje!

• Za ubijanje?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Ma moj kurac. Ti si neki teški šaljivdžija.

• I dalje ste spremni za borbu?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Još sam uvijek u snazi. Vježbam svaki dan osim subote i nedjelje. Moje ruke više nisu sigurne da bih se bavio eksplozivima, ali još se mogu baciti na pod i raditi sklekove. Mogu napraviti dvjesto sklekova, trbušnjaka, odavde, s kreveta. Nekada sam ih mogao napraviti tri tisuće. Klupu koristim kao utege. Ovaj stan je kao tvrđava. Ako dođu po mene, sve ću pobiti.

• Koliko ste do sada ljudi ubili?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Ima puno stvari koje ne mogu reći čak ni tebi. Koliko sam ih ubio, nije važno. Brojim do sedamnaest i onda prestanem. To su samo brojke. Prvi sam put ubio kad mi je bilo četrnaest godina, a zadnji put, mislim, 1976. Ali o tome neću govoriti. Vjerojatno nisam trebao reći ni puno toga što si ti čuo od mene. Moja žena i djeca su i dalje u Sjedinjenim Državama.

• Kakav je to osjećaj kad nekoga ubijate?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Kakvo ti je sad to, kurac, pitanje?

• Nakon tako ekstremnog života, sigurno se teško primiriti se i prestati sa svime.

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Nisam ja ništa prestao. I dalje dobro jebem. Imam par mladih cura. Vidiš ovu ovdje? Kakve sise, kosa! Imam ja i nekih drugih poslova, ali nećemo o tome. Imam para i žena i to je za mene i dalje jako dobar život. Imam kuću u Crnoj Gori, veliki stan u Novom Sadu i ovaj stan u Beogradu. Sredio sam se.

• Na zidovima vidim slike Hitlera, Staljina i Mussolinija. Jesu li oni vaši idoli?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: To su veliki ljudi.

• I veliki ubojice.

NIKOLA KAVAJA: I američki predsjednici su ubijali ljude.

• A ona slika?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: To je Dragiša sa svojom osmogodišnjom kćerkom. Ubili su ih agenti jugoslavenske Državne bezbednosti 1977. On je bio veliki čovjek. Nedostaje mi. Nedostaje mi to vrijeme.

• Kako mislite da će vas pamtiti?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Po zlu.

Dok je CIA radila na tome da Brozu skine glavu... FBI je nastojao da je sacuva.
Last edited by Fair Life on 17/12/2006 20:59, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 17/12/2006 20:54

muha_sa wrote:pa dragi šerlok--jel ovo samo za one koji znaju engleski?


kolega, nisi valjda vec u svecku stigo? :D

evo fair izvadi situaciju

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Post by Patron of Formello » 17/12/2006 20:54

Ovaj intervju je ponovno baljezganje četničkog govneta Nikole Kavaje koje je navodno pokušavalo da ubije Tita 4 puta. :oops:

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Post by muha_sa » 17/12/2006 21:06

ovo je neki pripadnik EL KAIDE :D

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Post by Nancy Drew » 17/12/2006 21:07

...
Last edited by Nancy Drew on 09/02/2009 11:20, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by muha_sa » 17/12/2006 21:08

SherlockHolmes wrote:
muha_sa wrote:pa dragi šerlok--jel ovo samo za one koji znaju engleski?


kolega, nisi valjda vec u svecku stigo? :D

evo fair izvadi situaciju

svaka mu čast--da nije njega,nikad ne bih znao da kod Srba ima terorista

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 17/12/2006 21:26

Nancy Drew wrote:Živ bio Sherlock al' čemu ova tema?
:?


ziva bila, nancika, zasto ne :?

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Post by Svemirski_Jebach » 17/12/2006 22:28

sranje zesce, onaj ko je stvarno bio neki kurac palac agent i ubica ne daje ovako javno ispovijesti.

Ovo je neko cetnicko govno, sifofrenicni smrdo koji je vecinu ovoga ocigledno izmislio...ono sto je tacno pretpostavljam od svega jeste da je bio u cetnickoj emigraciji u americi, te da je vjerovatno ucestvovao u nekim antijugoslavenskim operacijama.

Koliko je takvih UDBA likvidirala sirom svijeta...ko to zna. A onako za referncu, knjiga Dvadeseti covjek o ustaskim teroristima koji su upali u Jugoslaviju s ciljem rusenja poretka. Nadali se da ce ih narod podrzati medjutim sipak, svi pobijeni negdje oko Bugojna njih 19.

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 17/12/2006 22:36

1979 June 20 and June 21: An American Airlines flight from New York to Chicago was hijacked by Nikola Kavaja, a Serbian nationalist, demanding the release of a jailed fellow nationalist. Unable to secure his comrade's release, the hijacker released all hostages except for the pilot, co-pilot and one flight attendant. They flew from Chicago back to New York where he transferred to a Boeing 707, which flew to Ireland where the hijacker surrendered and was returned to the United States for trial. Weapon used was a home-made bomb. There were no casualties.

http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Aircraft_hijacking

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Post by Svemirski_Jebach » 18/12/2006 04:52

ma znam za to al kao ovi ga placali da ubije tita...ma daj. cudno mi je da neki tako "tajni" agenti ovako javno daju iskaze.

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Fair Life
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Post by Fair Life » 18/12/2006 05:36

Imajuci u vidu da je Kavaja namjeravao avionom preletjeti Atlantic i zabiti se u zgradu CK KPJ u Beogradu...

Nije li njegova ideja posluzila al-Qa'idi za udar na WTC?

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Post by halo_ba » 18/12/2006 07:08

Zamisli, Sherlok, tip je pokusao da ubije Tita i unisti CK KPJ.... :D
zar nije za obozavati? :D :D

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Fair Life
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Post by Fair Life » 18/12/2006 07:24

[url=http://www.63padobranska.co.yu/d/viewtopic.php?p=10817&sid=d123c043e6a60264b3e0f7e5b87a1515](...)]

• Nikada niste voljeli Tita?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Mrzio sam ga. U to vrijeme postao sam član tajne antikomunističke organizacije. Tada zapravo počinje moj pravi život. Moj komandir, Milutin Abramović, bio je u zrakoplovstvu sa mnom, u Somboru. Znao je za moju braću, da su pobijeni i da je jedan u zatvoru. I neki moji rođacil su također završili u zatvoru. Zato mi je počeo davati tajne zadatke. Moja je mržnja bila sasvim osobne prirode.

• Koji je bio vaš prvi zadatak?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Tražio je da na zidove u kasarni napišem: Živio Sovjetski Savez, Dolje Tito, Dolje Komunistička partija. Mislim da je to bila provjera. Obavio sam to, bilo mi je smiješno - kakav mi je to [email protected]#$* bio zadatak.

• Kako se Titu svidio vaš smisao za humor?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Ja sam to napisao u subotu navečer. Već u nedelju ujutro su vojni obavještajci istraživali tko je to učinio. Bila je to velika uzbuna. Nitko nije smio napuštati kasarnu. Nakon tri dana ispitivanja počeli su zatvarati ljude. Uhapsili su majora koji je bio zadužen za sigurnost te večeri i on je dobio sedam godina. Dva moja druga su također uhapsili i strpali u zatvor. Ali mene nisu. Tako mi je Abramović dao sljedeći zadatak. Trebao sam odletjeti do austrijske i mađarske granice i ispustiti tisuće letaka na kojima su bile ispisane poruke. Koji je to, bre, bio [email protected]#$*? Uzeo sam letke, prošvercao ih u svoj avion u noćnoj smjeni. Na lecima je pisalo 'Ustajte, ljudi! Borite se za svoju slobodu! Tito je prevario jugoslavenski narod. Radnici, seljaci, vratite ono što je vaše!'

• Niste se bojali da će vas uhvatiti?

NIKOLA KAVAJA: Ko bi ga znao. Tada su me više zanimali nogomet i djevojke. Ovo me nasmijavalo. Učinio sam to i opet je bila velika uzbuna sljedećeg jutra i još je više ljudi pohapšeno.

Sljedeći je zadatak bio ozbiljan. Bio je to u lipnju 1953. Zadatak je bio da dignem u zrak tankove s gorivom na somborskom aerodromu. Te sam baze poznavao kao vlastitu sobu. Moj zapovjednik dao mi je bombe s tajmerom i ja sam ih postavio pokraj rezervoara u kojima su bili milijuni litara benzina. Učinio sam to noću. Postavio sam bombe oko rezervoara i odšetao. Kad su bombe detonirale, bila je to ogromna eksplozija. Bilo je to nevjerojatno. Ja sam već bio daleko, ali sam dobro vidio ogromne žute plamene eksplozije na noćnom nebu. Kad sam to vidio, bilo mi je jasno da to više nije bila zajebancija. Bilo je to veliko sranje. Milicija i istražitelji pročešljali su cijelu bazu i sva okolna mjesta. Pohapsili su stotine ljudi. Znao sam ih sedmoricu. Jedan od njih je bio veliki heroj. On je dobio smrtnu kaznu. A ni za što! Drugi su pocrkali po zatvorima.

(...)[/url]

Svemirski_Jebach
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Post by Svemirski_Jebach » 18/12/2006 08:27

sto ga UDBA ne ubi jebem li joj uh...naljuti se odmah

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Fair Life
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Post by Fair Life » 18/12/2006 08:55

Svemirski_Jebach wrote:sto ga UDBA ne ubi jebem li joj uh...naljuti se odmah

[quote="Image
Novi sad, Petak, 11. april 2003. godine"](...)
U Srbiju se vratio krajem 1997. godine. Suprotno svim očekivanjima od čoveka koji se celog svog života borio protiv komunista Kavaja je ubrzo postao obožavalac “lika i dela” Slobodana Miloševića.
Možda i zato svega godinu dana posle povratka u Srbiju, od tadašnjeg režima je dobio stan u beogradskom naselju Medaković.

Međutim, Nikola Kavaja nije mogao bez paravojnih grupa. U proleće 1998. godine, u Pivi, u Crnoj Gori, formirao je kamp “Bataljon smrti” za obuku srpskih dobrovoljaca i komandosa za borbu protiv albanskih terorista na Kosovu, kao i za suprotstavljanje kopnenim snagama NATO-a. Ipak, koliko je poznato, ovaj “bataljon” nije dobio dozvolu od Miloševićeve vlasti za učešće u operacijama u južnoj pokrajini. Ostala je, međutim, tajna koliko je srpskih dobrovoljaca prošlo kroz ovaj kamp, po čijem je odobrenju radio i da li su, eventualno, kasnije neki od polaznika izvodili i samostalne terorističko-mafijaške akcije.[/quote]

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 18/12/2006 09:05

halo_ba wrote:Zamisli, Sherlok, tip je pokusao da ubije Tita i unisti CK KPJ.... :D
zar nije za obozavati? :D :D


jesi, fakat si ti meni shega :D :D

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 18/12/2006 09:16

dobar dio americke cetnicke imigracije je na jedan ili drugi nacin bio povezan sa cia-om. sta je kavaji stvarno naredjivano, a sta je neko "izmedju" na svoju ruku odlucio je pitanje, ali ne bi me iznenadilo da je stvarno s vremena na vrijeme bio ukljucen u kojekakve "operacije".

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Post by Patron of Formello » 18/12/2006 09:25

SherlockHolmes wrote:
halo_ba wrote:Zamisli, Sherlok, tip je pokusao da ubije Tita i unisti CK KPJ.... :D
zar nije za obozavati? :D :D


jesi, fakat si ti meni shega :D :D


Sherly boy :D je odavno zreo za 20 godina Golog Otoka. 8-)
Sad mi fino objasni koji je povod za otvaranje ove teme?Da li je u pitanju divljenje Kavaji ili patološka mržnja prema socijalizmu i Titu?

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 18/12/2006 09:43

ponajvise da bi budalasi imali sta pitati :D

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Post by Patron of Formello » 18/12/2006 09:49

Inteligentan odgovor sherly boy,divim ti se. :-) :-) :-)

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Post by halo_ba » 18/12/2006 10:07

SherlockHolmes wrote:ponajvise da bi budalasi imali sta pitati :D


Jednog dana rijesio moj babo
da mu gazda bude Hitler Svabo
Pa obuko svapske gace
i reko na Ruse da ce
ici ako treba...
al' ga Tito sjeba.

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Post by SherlockHolmes » 18/12/2006 10:10

sad mi fakat zao tvog babe, ne samo zbog gaca, tite, hitlera i rusa. :(

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Post by halo_ba » 18/12/2006 10:12

SherlockHolmes wrote:sad mi fakat zao tvog babe, ne samo zbog gaca, tite, hitlera i rusa. :(

Hvala, Sherlok, ali pjesma je posvecena drugoj strani. Sad, jesu li tvoji srodnici bili na toj strani, nisam sigurna.
Ali znam na kojoj strani bi ti bio da je sad '41.

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