Cannes 2007 Program

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Cannes 2007 Program

Post by repeater » 19/04/2007 21:38

bice dobro, bice dobro ... :D :D

British director Stephen Frears will serve as the president of the Cannes competition jury and will be joined by actress Maggie Cheung from Hong Kong, actress Toni Collette from Australia, director and actress Maria de Medeiros from Portugal, director and actress Sarah Polley from Canada, director Marco Bellocchio from Italy, writer Orhan Pamuk from Turkey, director and actor Michel Piccoli from France, and director Abderramane Sissako from Mauritania.

In Competition

"My Blueberry Nights," directed by Wong Kar-Wai -- opening film
"Auf Der Anderen Seite," directed by Fatih Akin
"Un Veille Maitresse," directed by Catherine Breillat
"No Country For Old Men," directed by Joel & Ethan Coen
"Zodiac," directed by David Fincher
"We Own The Night," directed by James Gray
"Les Chansons D'Amour," directed by Christophe Honore
"Mogari No Mori," directed by Naomi Kawase
"Breath," directed by Kim Ki Duk
"Promise Me This," directed by Emir Kusturica
"Secret Sunshine," directed by Lee Chang-dong
"4 Luni, 3 Saptamini Si 2 Zile," directed by Christian Mungiu
"Tehilim," directed by Raphael Nadjari
"Stellet Licht," directed by Carlos Reygadas
"Persepolis," directed by Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud
"Le Scaphandre et le Papillon," directed by Julian Schnabel
"Import Export," directed by Ulrich Seidl
"Alexandra," directed by Alexandre Sokourov
"Death Proof," directed by Quentin Tarantino
"The Man From London," directed by Bela Tarr
"Paranoid Park," directed by Gus Van Sant
"Izgnanie" (The Banishment), directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev

Out of Competition
"Sicko," directed by Michael Moore
"Ocean's Thirteen," directed by Steven Soderbergh
"A Mighty Heart," directed by Michael Winterbottom

Midnight Screenings
"Boarding Gate," directed Olivier Assayas
"Go Go Tales," directed by Abel Ferrara
"U2 3D," directed by Catherine Owens and Mark Pellington

Special Screenings
"11th Hour," directed by Leila Conners Petersen and Nadia Conners
"The War," directed by Lynn Novick and Ken Burns
"Retour en Normandie," directed by Nicolas Philibert
"He Fengming," directed by Wang Bing

Un Certain Regard
"Le Reve de la Nuit d'Avant," directed by Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi
"Calle Santa Fe," directed by Carmen Castillo (first film)
"Munyurangabo," directed by Chung Lee Isaac (first film)
"Et Toi T'Es Sur Qui?" directed by Lola Doillon (first film)
"El Bano del Papa," directed by Enrique Fernandes and Cesar Charlone (first film)
"Bikur Hatizmoret," directedd by Eran Kolirin (first film)
"Mister Lonely," directed by Harmony Korine
"Magnus," directed by Kadri Kousaar (first film)
"Mang Shan," directed by Li Yang
"Mio Fratello E Figlio Unico," directed by Daniele Luchetti
"California Dreamin' (Nesfarsit)," directed by Christian Nemescu (first film)
"La Soledad," directed by Jaime Rosales
"L'Avocat de la Terreur," directed by Barbet Schroeder
"Les Pieuvres," directed by Celine Sciamma (first film)
"Am Ende Kommen Touristen," directed by Robert Thalheim
"Kuaile Gongchang," directed by Ekachai Uekrongtham

The Un Certain Regard jury includes head Pascale Ferran, along with Jasmine Trinca, Cristi Puiu, Kent Jones and Bian Qin and the Camera d'or jury for a film by a first time director will be headed by Pavel Longuine along with Julie Bertucelli, Clotilde Courau and Renato Berta.

Short Films in Competition
"Run," directed by Mark Alston (New Zealand)
"The Oate's Valor," directed by Tim Thaddeus Cahill (United States)
"The Last 15," directed by Antonio Campos (United States)
"Ah Ma" (Grandma), directed by Anthony Chen (Singapore)
"Resistance Aux Tremblements," directed by Olivier Hems (France)
"Ark," directed by Grzegorz Jonkajtys (Poland)
"Ver Llover," directed by Elisa Miller (Mexico)
"To Onoma Tou Spourgitiou," directed by Kyros Papavassiliou (Cypress)
"Spegelbarn" (Looking Glass), directed by Erik Rosenlund (Sweden)
"Het Zusje" (My Sister), directed by Marco Van Geffen (The Netherlands)
"My Dear Rosseta," directed by Yang Hae-hoon (South Korea)

La Cinefondation
"Aditi Singh," directed by Mickael Kummer (Le Fresnoy, France)
"Ahora Todos Parecen Contentos," directed by Gonzalo Tobal (Universidad del Cine, Argentina)
"Your Younger Daughter Rachel," directed by Efrat Corem (Sapir Academic College, Israel)
"Chinese Whispers," directed by Raka Dutta (Satyajit Ray Film & Television Institute, India)
"For the Love of God," directed by Joseph Tucker (NFTS, U.K.)
"Goyta," directed by Joanna Jurewicz (NYU, U.S.)
"Hable Stunden," directed by Nicolas Wackerbarth (DFFB, Germany)
"Minus," directed by Pavle Vuckovic (Fakultet Dramskih Umetnosti, Serbia)
"Pathways," directed by Hagar Ben-Asher (Minshar School, Israel)
"Imprudence," directed by Alexander Kugel (VGIK, Russia)
"A Reunion," directed by Hong Sung-hoon (KAFA, South Korea)
"Rondo," directed by Marja Mikkonen (Finnish Academy of Fine Arts, Finland)
"Way Out," directed by Chen Tao (Beijing Film Academy, China)
"Saba," directed by Therezaa Menezes and Gregorio Graziosi (FAAP University, Brazil)
"Triple 8 Palace," directed by Alexander Ku (NYU, U.S.)
"Vita Di Giacomo," directed by Luca Governatori (La femis, France)


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Post by repeater » 19/04/2007 21:57

jos vijesti ..

As part of its 60th anniversary celebration, the Festival de Cannes has commissioned 35 directors to participate in a collective film "To Each His Own Cinema," a collection of three-minute films focused on the "movie theater." In the words of an announcement today, each director was given carte blanche to come up with their own personal interpretation. Canadian artist Robert Carsen, who recently directed Leonard Bernstein's "Candide" at the Theatre du Chatelet, has created an on-stage introduction to the film for the Theatre Lumiere in Cannes. "To Each His Own Cinema" will have its world debut on Sunday, May 20 and broadcast the same evening on Canal+.

The "To Each His Own Cinema" directors are...

Theo Angelopoulos, Olivier Assayas, Bille August, Jane Campion, Youssef Chahine, Chen Kaige, Michael Cimino, Ethan & Joel Coen, David Cronenberg, Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne, Manoel De Oliveira, Raymond Depardon, Atom Egoyan, Amos Gitai, Hou Hsiao Hsien, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Aki Kaurismaki, Abbas Kiarostami, Takeshi Kitano, Andrei Konchalovsky, Claude Lelouch, Ken Loach, Nanni Moretti, Roman Polanski, Raoul Ruiz, Walter Salles, Elia Suleiman, Tsai Ming Liang, Gus Van Sant, Lars Von Trier, Wim Wenders, Wong Kar Wai, Zhang Yimou.

The film is designed and produced by Gilles Jacob and co-produced by the Festival de Cannes and Elzevir Films with the cooperation of Canal+, in association with Studiocanal and Arte, and with the support of the Centre National de la Cinematographie (C.N.C.) and the participation of DIGImage and LVT.

Other 60th Anniversary events include tribute screenigns of "Boxes" by Jane Birkin, "Roman De Gare" by Claude LeLouch and "Ulzhan" by Volker Schlondorff.

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Post by repeater » 20/04/2007 23:07

trudicu se da postavim sto vise informacija o ovogodisnjim filmovima u glavnoj kategoriji. za pocetak:

Import Export - Ulrich Seidel (Austrija)

SYNOPSIS:
One film about two fates. One is about Olga, a young nurse from the Ukraine. The other one is about Paul, a young hooligan from the Viennese suburbs. Both are unemployed, both are living on the edge of society. She believes that she will find her luck in the West. Whereas he ends up in the East in the persuit for love, happiness and a meaning of life.

ImageImageImage

INTERVIEW
All your films have a basic idea which is given a narrative structure, and then everything gradually condenses during shooting. What was the basic idea for Import Export?

Ulrich Seidl: Firstly I wanted to shoot in the East. I’ve had a personal connection to eastern Europe for a long time now because of my film Mit Verlust ist zu rechnen, which was set at the Czech border 14 years ago. And also because of my pet project Der Grasl, which is about a legendary 19th century criminal. I’ve traveled to Romania several times to scout for locations for the latter. During these trips I felt a growing desire to shoot in an eastern European country. The basic idea was as follows: Two young people are unemployed, they’re looking for work and meaning in their lives, and they make a move. The woman, Olga, goes from the East to the West, and the man goes from the West to the East. Another key part of the theme is looking for work. It was supposed to revolve around unemployment and the difficulty of finding a job, and how you can find a meaning for your life and a place in society.

I had the impression that Dog Days has more to do with various kinds of loneliness, while Import Export points out society's blind spots.

Ulrich Seidl: That may be because more of this film’s set in public spaces than private ones, such as the geriatric ward at Lainz, a hospital in Ukraine, a school for cleaning staff and, in the case of male lead Paul, at the employment office, on an open-air market, and in the subway.

Is the theme of aging and how it's dealt with by society more important because of the scenes shot at Lainz?

Ulrich Seidl: That’s right. In the screenplay the geriatric ward was only one of the places where Olga worked. First she cleaned house for a family, which didn’t work out, and later she ends up at this hospital. But as often happens with my style of working, things become more or less important than originally planned. The geriatric ward was an extreme example. I did a lot more shooting there and added minor characters such as Maria Hofstätter and Georg Friedrich as nurses. I discovered that this was a setting where I could tell a story much more intensely with the patients, which are the most authentic actors around.

Why did you decide to shoot in Ukraine?

Ulrich Seidl: Because of the locations there and the fact that Ukraine is even farther away from Europe than Romania. The social gap separating it from Central Europe is obvious and painfully tangible. When I went to Romania ten years ago the difference was visible there, and this border has moved farther east since then. More preparation and financing was necessary for Import Export than any of my other films. We auditioned almost 1500 people in Austria and Ukraine.

What were you looking for in your female lead?

Ulrich Seidl: That was another learning process. First we looked for a Ukrainian living in Austria. But it turned out that the Ukrainians living here adapt after a few months, and then the freshness of being in the West isn’t as authentic anymore. I wanted an actress who had never been in the West, who really comes here for the first time during production of the film. I wanted her sensations and experiences to be truly authentic. We found Katja in a town in southern Ukraine, and she couldn’t speak a word of German or English. We took her to Kiev and found a German teacher for her. After two months she came to Austria, four weeks before shooting started. She knew the story’s arc, but there wasn’t a detailed screenplay. That wasn’t always easy, because she was very suspicious. She had heard stories from the media about how many girls end up as prostitutes and definitely suspected that the project shouldn’t be taken seriously. There was a lot of fear to overcome, which made production more difficult.

It seems that the preparations for shooting entailed a great deal of work.

Ulrich Seidl: Obtaining shooting permits has become extremely difficult. Many institutions react with fear first and foremost. That even happens at locations where you wouldn’t expect it, such as the employment office, a public institution. In my opinion it’s indicative of the current state of our society that every company, every institution, possibly every individual thinks in terms of image, and the situation’s dominated by fear that misinformation will be spread. At the geriatric ward in particular, which already has a bad image, I said repeatedly that the only way to improve things is through openness. Building a wall is the wrong way to go about it. That just creates distrust.

I'm sure you were confronted with fragile, incalculable moments while shooting at locations such as the geriatric ward. Have you found them to be especially challenging as a director?

Ulrich Seidl: From my previous films I’m used to spontaneously including real events and have developed my own working style. I wanted to work on an authentic set at a hospital’s geriatric ward?that was extremely important to me. I wanted to make it possible to capture everything that happened on film, and at the same time tell a story with the actors. It’s not always certain that that will work when shooting starts. And when there’s not enough preparation, you lose. I try to walk this tightrope between precise preparation and being open to the unforeseeable.

There were two cinematographers this time. Was Ed Lachman someone you've always wanted to work with?

Ulrich Seidl: No, not really. I met Ed Lachman at the Viennale, when there was a retrospective of his work. He was thoroughly impressed by my films. That was it for the time being. A year later we met at the IDFA in Amsterdam, where I had a retrospective. I spontaneously asked him if he wanted to shoot my next film, and he immediately agreed to all the conditions. That meant Austrian conditions with regard to the pay, and my conditions, meaning there would be very little technical equipment for the lighting, which is his particular talent. I wanted to make a fiction film, but with the budget of a documentary. Lachman then had Wolfgang Thaler, who shot Dog Days, to help him. Thaler operated the camera, Lachman did the lighting, and I think that it was an enriching experience for both of them. It was great for me. I also think that this film will have a different look than my others.

What was this like for you, being your own producer, in retrospect?

Ulrich Seidl: Basically, it wasn’t more difficult, but there was a lot more pressure. For the first time I had both the artistic and financial responsibility. In disputes however the director in me always won out. I’m extremely happy that I made the step of producing my own film, because it helped me avoid a lot of problems. But it’s not a bed of roses. I’ve invested in the company for three years now, and it hasn’t made any money. After all, this is the first film we’ve produced.

What was the film's budget?

Ulrich Seidl: The budget’s 2.1 million euros. That isn’t very much, and getting the financing together wasn’t easy. One subsidizer didn’t give us enough money, so we had to make new calculations and couldn’t start shooting on schedule. The budget was extremely tight, and it’s actually a minor miracle that we made it to the end, because the time it took cost money.

Interview: Karin Schiefer
06/2006
Austrian Film Commission

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Post by repeater » 20/04/2007 23:43

Aleksandra - Aleksandr Sokurov (Rusija)

SYNOPSIS:
According to the title an old woman named Alexandra comes to the military unit to see her grandson – the officer of Russian Army, who serves in Chechnya. A long talk with her grandson - a young officer – like a complicated way to each other, a chance meeting with an unknown native woman and a walk around the “wounded” city… - all these events of the latest two days move her heart deeply.The film tells about the delicate gift of human relations. “Alexandra” has something in common with the previous “elegies” of the master (“Father and Son”, “Mother and Son”), but this story is the author’s old-standing intention to shoot a film where an actress performs, and from where her role will become an important event of her creative life.

Image

INTERVIEW:
Alexandr Sokurov, director and screenwriter

Who is Alexandra?

- The main character in the film is an ordinary Russian woman who has lived a long and hard life but remained beautiful and stately, and who has the kind of wisdom and real life experience characteristic of strong people.

Why does she decide to visit her grandson? What does she expect from the trip?

- Alexandra decides to help her grandson – she wants to give the kind of help only family can provide, with tenderness and understanding. She senses that this strong military officer, who fulfills tough military assignments, has problems that he cannot resolve. They are connected with his values and world view, and Alexandra believes that her help – the help of a close relative – can give him strength: she will answer his questions and ask him some of her own.

What does she discover during her trip? What lesson does she learn?

- During her trip Alexandra doesn’t meet a single negative person. Before she left she thought that she’d arrive in a place where everything would be torn apart like open wounds, a place of hatred, spite, and resentment. But she is delighted to discover that there is no spite, no resentment, no hatred among the military. She finds people who need warmth, tenderness and understanding. She understands everyone she meets with her heart and soul – the officers or young soldiers in the garrison, the Chechan women she meets on the streets of the ruined city. She doesn’t feel any sense of distance from them. She is delighted to discover that she understands this world – there are no incurable diseases here.

Her lessons? Those are beyond the action in the film.

- I think that she doesn’t really learn anything new during her trip to the Caucasus. She has always been a wise and grounded woman. On her trip she only confirms the maternal observations that she has made for many years: that hatred is not the basis of life, that there is goodness, which is greater than anything else. All you need to do is to understand a person with your heart.

How does she get along with the local population?

- Alexandra meets with local women, children and teenagers and doesn’t feel a bit of fear, since there is nothing in them to fear. Alexandra remembers war; she experienced dislocation and knows how hard it is to achieve peace. She knows why a young Chechan boy looks at her severely. Her “wisdom of the soul” allows her to quickly find a common language with a Chechan woman of her own age and become friends.

What were your first impressions from the trip to scout locations?

- The action in the film takes place in the city of Grozny in Chechnya. Alexandra’s grandson serves in a garrison not far from the city.We went to the Caucasus to scout locations. We met with the military and civil leaders, who were all ready to provide assistance. In Grozny we visited a theater that is, unfortunately, still not functional but is being repaired and reconstructed. We saw a rehearsal: the actors performed in the Chechan language, but their technique was no different than in, say, St. Petersburg theaters. The women were excellent actors – expressive and totally open. We liked the young actors who had just graduated from the Advanced School of Theatrical Arts in Moscow. I cast several of them in our film.

As far as the locations go – I didn’t see anything that astonished me in Grozny. I had already been in war zones before, and I’d been in Chechnya when people were still living in trenches and killing each other. Today life there gives the impression of returning to peace: people are trying to repair their housing and create jobs.

However, they are greatly hindered by local traditions (the system of seniority, corruption, and nepotism). I would even say that these are the main obstacles to solving the majority of the problems. Unfortunately, virtually the entire Russian population has disappeared, and these were people who worked in factories. As a result, industry is at a standstill and there are a great number of ruined and abandoned houses. But I want to stress that we didn’t feel any ill will from any of the local residents. I spoke with many people, went into ruined buildings and apartments where people are trying to live. They have many questions for their leaders, who they believe are not providing adequate assistance.

Most of the young people do not live in the republic. Their mothers send them to school or to work outside Chechnya. The women are afraid their children will be led astray if they stay. No one I spoke with cited partisan warfare, the policy of separatism from Russia, or justified the men’s military activities. These destitute women are filled with an absolutely rational and reasonable sense of forgiveness and a very rational desire to keep the peace.

As the director, what are you going to focus on in the story?

- The atmosphere, mood, people’s eyes, portraits. I very much want the movie-goer to see compelling portraits and very simple, understandable people. I want to show them eyes that understand, eyes that forgive.

The film is not depressing; the mood is definitely one of hope. We want to create a feeling of heart-felt, mutual understanding.

I hope we’ll be able to convey truthfully the conditions that people are living in – the Chechans and the Russians serving there. But this sense of mutual understanding that comes from the heart – this is what I want to convey most of all.

How clearly is the context of the war in Chechnya going to be depicted in the film?

- There is certainly tension there, and you can’t avoid it. But war never resolves problems. There is no such thing as a “victorious war.”

What vision of Russia do you wish to convey through the image of Alexandra?

- For me, Alexandra is a kind of supporting character – a beautiful, wise, victorious woman. The name Alexandra means “Defender of Mankind.” She is victorious by virtue of the power of love, understanding and intelligence. She is the strong and profound image of the warrior, the protector of the Good. That is why we chose a particular actress who has this kind of regal bearing.

How would you describe the film Alexandra in the context of your work?

- This film is one of my most important works. It came out of a meeting with the brilliant actress I want to play the leading role. This is one those rare cases when the need to make a film that is filled with goodness and good people coincided with the great desire to preserve for posterity the great gift of an actress who is truly representative of the people, truly Russian. And perhaps it is one of the most magical of my films, since I find more mythic subtexts in it than in any other film I’ve made. I’ve never done anything like this.

You can never say that you will make a perfect film. Every single one of my pictures has faults. In each new work you try to overcome your past mistakes and do something better.

I am extremely grateful to Andrey (Andrey Sigle, producer and general director of Proline-film), for his understanding and selfless dedication. His role in making this film is no less than mine, although I’m the director, author of the idea and the screenplay. I also hope that Andrei will agree to do the score for the film as he did for my previous films (The Sun, Taurus, Father and Son).

Work on this project has been difficult, and I hope this film will release something in my soul. I have great hopes for this movie.

Andrey Sigle, producer, film score composer

Why was Proline Film studios interested in Alexander Sokurov’s new project?

- Any project by Alexander Sokurov interests my studio and me personally, because he is the flag bearer for the Russian film industry. His films scale new heights and provide a glimpse into eternity. Collaborating in any capacity with Sokurov – as a musician or a producer – is always a milestone. Each time you stop and get a new sense of the language of film.

Why is this project so relevant today?

-This was particularly clear after our trip to . Sokurov’s film depicts the impulsive actions that might be taken by a person with power, a general, or officers if they can’t listen to people, if they don’t try to understand, if their main argument is a gun shot. You need only travel around Grozny and see the ruined houses with gaping, empty windows to feel intensely and profoundly the suffering of ordinary people when politicians can’t come to an agreement.

What kind of music will be in the film?

- The director and I have been discussing the musical fabric of the film constantly. On location I heard how different everything sounded. The air is different, sounds travel in a different way – you see everything there through the cries of human suffering. When you drive around Grozny, you see ruined houses all around you, and then suddenly a young girl crosses the road, carrying something in a white apron. You realize that humanity is like grass – always fighting for life, for light, straining toward the sun, breaking through the thick layer of lifeless asphalt. You have to see that, understand it, and feel it before you can write the music that will convey the meaning of the film.

Wasn’t it difficult to decide to film everything in the Caucasus? Are you taking a great risk?

- This film cannot be filmed in a sound stage. Once again I have to say that you get a different feeling of life in , you feel how people are pulling together and ready to help each other. And on the other hand, both the military and the Chechans whom we met all understood the importance of this film. It’s not about relations between Russians and Chechans, but about relations among people, among generations, among people of different nationalities and religions.

May 2006
Proline-Film

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Post by basta sljezove boje » 21/04/2007 22:10

Na Balkanu sve moguce

U NEKOJ cudnoj pokretnoj kuci, preduzecu - autobusu firme "Krivokapic", u originalnom dizajnu by Kusturica, strpljivo, po ko zna koji put, iznova i iznova, jedan decak, Uroš Milovanovic, koji u filmu igra glavnu ulogu, momcica Caneta, poliva se vodom u improvizovanoj tuš-kabini, napravljenoj od lima. Tu su ga sakrili, i od bande lokalnog mocnika i bosa (Mikija Manojlovica), štite ga Topuz (Stribor Kusturica) i njegov brat blizanac Runjo (Vlada Milojevic).

Posle svakog tuširanja Urošu oblace bade-mantil, stavljaju mu kapuljacu na glavu, umotavaju ga, on iskace iz autobusa i trci do Kusturice da sa njim odgleda scenu i sasluša komentare i nove instrukcije.

Cetrnaestogodišnji Uroš Milovanovic drugi put radi sa Kusturicom - prvi put glumio je u Unicefovom filmu “Plavi Ciganin”, a u “Zavetu” igra unuka koji od dede (tumaci ga Aleksandar Bercek) dobija zavet koji treba da ispuni - da proda kravu Cvetku, kupi ikonu i vrati se u selo sa ženom da održi i nastavi porodicu, dom, kucu, i život u selu.
Za Uroša, inace, cela ekipa kaže da je izuzetno talentovan i omiljen.

On je decak iz beogradskog naselja Bele vode, završio je sedmi razred osnovne škole i kaže da ga cinjenica da glumi glavnu ulogu u Kusturicinom filmu nije promenila i “ceo život cu biti isti”.

Uroš vec zna kako želi da živi...

- Da se malo ludiram, sve da probam, ali ne cigarete, drogu, alkohol i druge ružne stvari. Vrlo direktno rekao nam je da ga najviše zanima mlada i popularna glumica Mirka Vasiljevic.

- Kada bih sa njom glumio, javno bih izjavio da mi je ispunjena najveca želja! Ona je najlepša devojka koju sam video!

Topuz i Runjo, braca Krivokapic, su blizanci, ali Topuz (Stribor Kusturica), znatno je krupniji od svog brata koga glumi Vlada Milojevic. Identicno su obuceni u karirane belo-plave košulje i farmerke uvucene u kaubojke, koje su na stopalima zapravo srpski opanci. Pobratimi su sa decakom Canetom i njegovi zaštitnici od “gazdine” bande koja mu je ukrala kravu, ali i devojcicu u koju se zaljubio i kojom hoce da se oženi.

Stribor je, uz jednu od glavnih uloga koju igra u “Zavetu”, i autor muzike za film, koju je, kaže nam, komponovao sa svojim novim bendom (“još nemamo ni ime, ali bicete obavešteni”). I, po njegovim recima, to je neka “mešavina narodne i kafanske muzike - melanholicne i vesele - koja je pomešana sa modernim stilovima, kao što su rege i latino muzika”.
Stribor kaže da je umece glume “pokupio” iz iskustva sviranja bubnjeva.

- To je, zapravo, umece da ne preterujem ni kada sviram bubanj, niti kada glumim. Više mi leži, kako je to govorio Pavle Vuisic, inace, po mom mišljenju, naš najveci glumac svih vremena, da se “ponašam”.

Runjo Krivokapic je minijatura brata blizanca Topuza, i njih dvojica su “dobri momci”, a tumac ovog lika je Vlada Milojevic. Ovo je Vladi treci film koji radi sa Kusturicom - debitovao je u filmu “Život je cudo”, zatim je igrao u kratkom filmu “Plavi Ciganin” (ili “Stvarni kraj vikenda”), i sada u “Zavetu”.
Vlada u Stepojevcu, gde živi, drži fudbalsku školu za "petlice", pionire, a, kaže, ima i tridesetak devojaka iz Stepojevca i okoline, i kada završi obaveze oko filma pocece sa ozbiljnijim radom u svojoj fudbalskoj školi. Uveren je da je “ženski fudbal velika i ozbiljna prica, koju ce morati ozbiljno da shvate i veliki klubovi poput Zvezde i Partizana”.

A šta mu je doneo rad sa Kusturicom?

- Najvece iskustvo na svetu, meni se desilo iznenada i odmah, a da nisam ni sanjao.

Marija Petronijevic igra devojku Jasnu, u koju se zaljubljuje glavni junak, i posle silnih komicno-dramaticnih peripetija ona ce u zadnjem cinu ispunjenja dedinog zaveta, postati Canetova žena. Kažu da je prelepa, “kao Katrin Denev” i da je “hoce kamera”.

Prisustvovali smo snimanju kadra u kojem sa Canetom i svojom majkom beži u Šabac kod tetke da bi se spasli od strašnog “gazde”.

To putovanje vozom, koje je izrežirao Kusturica na jednom od koloseka užicke pruge, bila je i prilika da se Cane i Jasna prvi put ”filmski” poljube na prozoru kupea! I tako, licem uz lice, ušli su u tunel...
Marija je maturirala u gimnaziji u Požegi, a za ulogu Jasne odabrana je na kastingu, posle potrage koju je Kusturicina ekipa organizovala u više škola.

A kada je stala ispred Kusturice…

- Jao, pa nije mi bilo lako! Imala sam tremu i zato što sam prvi put stala ispred kamere, a narocito zbog cinjenice da stojim i glumim pred “profesorom”.

I u filmu Marija igra gimnazijalku, koja ce biti “žena Canetovog života”.

Filmska mama Jasni, vaspitacica je u decjem vrticu, a nocu, silom prilika i voljom “gazde”, kome se ne sme reci “ne”, je prostitutka. Kosanka Ðekic takode je prvi put na filmu. A u “Zavet” i pred “profu” stigla je kao radnik MUP Srbije, zaposlena u stanici milicije opštine Stari grad. Da bi mogla da glumi u Kusturicinom filmu, prema propisima službe, odobrenje joj je licno potpisao ministar Dragan Jocic, i zbog ove uloge nalazi se na neplacenom odsustvu.

- Ima tu - kaže - svakakvih scena, pa i onih lascivnih, sa “gazdom”.

On je “gazda” bez imena, jer je to dovoljno.

- Gazda je, zapravo, sve ono što jeste grad, bilo koji grad u zemlji Srbiji, koji, pri tom, želi što pre u Evropu - kaže Miki Manojlovic. - Poseban osecaj imam zbog cinjenice da radim sa vecinom ljudi koji su prvi put pred kamerom. To je retka veština, iskustvo, I, takode, za mene velika škola, jer ja igram samo sa njima.

A ti glumci su - jedan zlatiborski ugostitelj, beogradski osnovac, maturantkinja iz Požege, radnica MUP Srbije, fudbalski trener i mnogo statista...

A od onih velikih glumaca, u “Zavetu” igraju još Aleksandar Bercek i Ljiljana Blagojevic.

MALO ŽIVOTA, MALO FILMA

STANOJE Bogicevic Cvaka, uspešni zlatiborski ugostitelj, vlasnik kafea “Mondo”, “Zlatiborska jezera” i picerije “Fama”, prvi put je na filmu, mada je bio jedan od glavnih likova u reklami za kecap koju je Kusturica radio za Ruse. U filmu “Zavet” Cvaka ima jednu od velikih uloga - igra lokalnog kriminalca Pecikozu koji sa svojom bandom radi za velikog gazdu u Užicu.

A kako se dogodilo da uspešni ugostitelj stane ispred kamere, i to baš kod Kusturice?

- Upoznali smo se u mom lokalu dok je on radio prethodni film “Život je cudo”. Verovatno je tada poceo da me “posmatra”, a rezultat toga je uloga u reklamnom spotu i ova u “Zavetu”.

EMIR KUSTURICA
UVEK PRAVIM BRANU


“ZAVET” okuplja sva moja dosadašnja interesovanja i krece se izmedu bajkovitosti i onoga kako Andric kaže da je “na Balkanu u svakom trenutku moguce sve” - kaže Emir Kusturica, reditelj i koscenarista filma koji ce ponovo, naredne godine, “zadesiti” Kan.

* Što znaci da vaš film treba da isprica šta se sa selom u Srbiji dogada?

- Da, dogada se da naše selo nestaje, odumire i da u njemu nestaje života, ali ja želim da filmom vratim taj život. Inace, kada sam snimao prethodni film “Život je cudo”, u selu Dobroselice video sam doslovno ono cime pocinje ovaj film - uciteljica ujutru dode u školu, skuva kafu i ceka jedinog daka koga ima. To je bila škola “Vuk Karadžic” koju su srušili Amerikanci u NATO bombardovanju, gadajuci Tornik. Ali, i da je nisu srušili, isti bi problem ostao, jer zapadna Srbija, koja je naslonjena na planinske vence, u trouglu sa Bosnom i Crnom Gorom, postaje prostor koji ostaje bez ljudi. Hteo sam da zavirim u tajne takvog sela i da pokažem ko su i kakvi su to ljudi i njihovi životi. Naravno, mene je život koji ovde živim preporucio da napravim ovaj film, jer on proistice duboko iz mog iskustva.

* I ponovo gradite novo selo, asfaltiraju se putevi, prave se ski-staze, posle ce proraditi i žicara?

- Ja sam poput dabrova koji kad nadu reku, odmah nadu i nacina da je pregrade, navlace drva, kamen, prave brane, prave cudo. Tako i ja…

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Post by repeater » 23/04/2007 07:26

Une Vieille Maîtresse- Catherine Breillat

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INTERVIEW:

Therapy for Paralysis: Controversial Film - The New York Times - 28 Jan 2007


"CINEMA saved my life,” Catherine Breillat said on a recent afternoon at her converted warehouse loft off the Canal St.-Martin.

In late 2004, at the age of 56, Ms. Breillat, the writer-director of challenging, sexually explicit films like “Romance” (1999), “Fat Girl” (2001) and “Anatomy of Hell” (2004), suffered a cerebral hemorrhage that paralyzed her left side. In the hospital she refused wheelchairs and antidepressants. But she willed herself to walk again, and after five months she was released. Then she got to work on her 11th film, “Une Vieille Maîtresse” (“An Old Mistress”), a costume drama based on an 1865 novel by Jules Amédée Barbey d’Aurevilly.

“If I hadn’t decided I was going to make this film, I never would have been able to bring myself to do all of this work just to be disabled,” Ms. Breillat said as she walked, unaided but with considerable effort, through her home in this gentrified industrial district. (She uses a cane outdoors.) “It wouldn’t have been worth it. Except maybe to learn to walk so that I could take the few steps required to throw myself out the window.”

Ms. Breillat’s new film, a departure from her recent work, is the “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”-style story, set in 19th-century Paris, of a man who is married off to an aristocratic young woman despite his long secret affair with a courtesan, played by Asia Argento. Made for about $10 million — almost four times the budget of her last film — “Une Vieille Maîtresse” is her first adaptation and first period film. She said she hoped it would be considered for the Cannes Film Festival, a party to which she has yet to be invited.

Ms. Breillat speaks in a husky voice that shapes complex paragraphs of thought. She is an outspoken and well-known figure here, a frequent guest on talk shows who is both respected and reviled by her compatriots, many of whom object to her starkly unromantic portrayals of human sexuality. Her accident and recovery made news, but there was no subsequent outpouring of public affection or support.

“There is a lot of hatred toward me in France,” she said with characteristic stoicism. “There is a discourse about me, that I am sulfurous, scandalous. Abroad they say I’m controversial. That, I don’t mind. In any case, if everyone who criticized me had actually bought a ticket to see my films, I’d be rich.”

Ms. Breillat said she had been able to continue making movies thanks largely to her close-knit longtime crew, which includes her producer, Jean-François Lepetit. “I was in the hospital, really paralyzed, I couldn’t move,” she said. “Nobody knew if I would walk again or even if my head was intact. Jean-François came to me and said, ‘You’ll see, we’ll do “Une Vieille Maîtresse.” ’ ”

Mr. Lepetit said in a phone interview that while he had doubts, he kept them to himself. “I knew that the only thing that would bind her back to living was to say that we were going to make the film,” he said.

During the three-month shooting schedule, which ended in June, an assistant shadowed Ms. Breillat to make sure she didn’t hurt herself. “I always direct with my body,” she said, laughing as she closed her eyes and swirled her arms in wide circles. “I need to arrange the actors in my own choreography. And while filming, it was funny, I did plenty of movements I was supposedly not able to do.”

Ms. Breillat insisted repeatedly that she did not wish to be seen as heroic. “I have absolutely no courage,” she said. “For me, the accident has no importance. I’ve stayed myself. It has not prevented me from making films. It was only important for the insurance.” (The insurers insisted on a stand-by director, just in case.)

Mr. Lepetit confirmed that it was business as usual during production, despite the logistical challenges — multiple sets, costume changes and numerous extras — presented to an auteur used to shooting intimate dramas in single rooms.

“Apart from her motor problems, psychologically she was in great form,” Mr. Lepetit said. “She has the same intellectual capacities.”

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He added that “Une Vieille Maîtresse” was a new level of filmmaking for Ms. Breillat, a way “to prove to those who have this idea that she’s stuck in a certain kind of filmmaking that she is capable of other kinds of work, even if she has the same obsessions. She’s still mostly interested in the relationships between men and women.”

While shooting on location in and around Paris and on an island off the coast of Brittany, where she owns a house, Ms. Breillat rested on a mattress during lighting setups and costume changes. “I was reasonable,” she said.


“I know she suffers, even if she doesn’t say it,” Michael Weill, Ms. Breillat’s casting director and assistant director, said in a phone interview. “But I think that cinema is like oxygen to her — and today even more so. It allows her to forget.

“She’s always had this way of making her personality disappear when she’s working. The cast and the crew become an extension of her own body. The sound engineer, for example, virtually becomes her ear. She becomes the film.”

Ms. Breillat’s legendarily intense working relationships with her actors was the subject of her film “Sex Is Comedy” (2002), which observes as a female director attempts to film sex scenes.

Previously, she said, she identified with the women in her films, but in “Une Vieille Maîtresse,” for the first time, she projected herself onto the male lead, played by Fu’ad Ait Aattou, a 25-year-old unknown, whom she said she had spotted in an outdoor cafe on the Champs-Elysées and proclaimed a new Alain Delon.

“He has something of a dandy about him,” she said. “His is the face I’ve always dreamed of filming. When I saw him, I said to my assistant, ‘He’s mine.’ I have a manner of inventing my actors that belongs only to me. They have to have total trust in me, to allow me to utterly possess them.”

In a telephone interview Mr. Ait Aattou demurred. “I wouldn’t say I felt possessed by her,” he said. “I let her carry me. She knows exactly where she is going all the time. As an actor, that gives you enormous freedom.”

He added that, in his recollection, it was he, an aspiring actor, who approached Ms. Breillat. He wanted to work with her for a simple reason, he said: “She is uncompromising; she says what she has to say absolutely, even if it’s raw or violent. She has a rare and real sincerity, and she is merciless about making sure that we project that same emotional sincerity.”

Mr. Ait Aattou added that while “Une Vieille Maîtresse” was a departure in terms of form, it was still classic Breillat, “at once burning with passion and cold as ice. That’s Catherine’s thing.”

Ms. Breillat has had four epileptic seizures since the accident, “like Dostoyevsky,” she said. She now wears an emergency beeper around her neck. “The whole body shakes, which is horrible. But at the same time it’s so strange that it’s interesting. The problem is that if you have them in succession, they’re lethal.”

She said her doctor had warned her to stay away from the potentially seizure-producing stimulation of the television and the computer screen, though she was watching television and writing a new screenplay on her laptop a day after being released from the hospital.

“People say I’m too intellectual,” she said. “But I totally defend intellectuality. If I hadn’t been cerebral and an intellectual, I’d be dead. Making this film was a challenge against death in fact.

“It’s the doctors who had the doubts,” she added. “I’ve always said that I’m like a phoenix. It’s always in the worst moments that I rise from my ashes.”
Last edited by repeater on 23/04/2007 21:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by repeater » 23/04/2007 07:55

Persepolis - Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud (Francuska)

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“Persepolis” is the poignant coming-of-age story of a precocious and outspoken young Iranian girl that begins during the Islamic Revolution. We meet nine-yearold Marjane when the fundamentalists first take power – forcing the veil on women and imprisoning thousands; follow her as she cleverly outsmarts the “social guardians” and discovers punk, ABBA and Iron Maiden, while living with the terror of government persecution and the Iran/Iraq war; then on to Austria as a teenager, where her parents send her to school in fear for her safety and, she has to combat being equated with the religious fundamentalism and extremism she fled her country to escape.

Marjane eventually gains acceptance in Europe but finds herself alone and horribly homesick, and returns to Iran to be with her family, though it means putting on the veil and living in a tyrannical society. After a difficult period of adjustment, she enters art school and marries, continuing to speak out against the hypocrisy she witnesses. At age twenty-four, she realizes that while she is deeply Iranian, she cannot live in Iran. She then makes the heartbreaking decision to leave her homeland for France, optimistic about her future, shaped indelibly by her past.

zvanicna stranica: http://www.sonypictures.com/classics/persepolis/
forspan: http://www.myspace.com/persepolislefilm

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Post by repeater » 24/04/2007 03:05

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The Oregonian (July 27, 2006)
Gus Van Sant: Local actors wanted!

Portland director Gus Van Sant has almost everything he needs to make his next movie: a plot, a setting, a hip subculture. Now all he needs is the actors. And he’s asking Portland to provide them.

“Paranoid Park,” as Van Sant’s film is currently called, is based on a novel by sometime Portlander Blake Nelson. The book will be published in September by Viking Juvenile, and the film will begin shooting around Portland in the fall.

Van Sant and his production company are holding three open casting calls in the next few weeks to help them find a star for the film and actors to fill important smaller roles, including extras — particularly skateboarding extras. And no experience is necessary, not even for the lead role.

“Paranoid Park” is set in the Portland skating world and concerns a teenage skaterboarder who accidentally kills a security guard and has to figure out what to do when police start to investigate the death. “It’s sort of ‘Crime and Punishment’ in high school,” Van Sant said Wednesday. “And since ‘Crime and Punishment’ is what high school is already like anyway, it’s kind of perfect.”

Van Sant says he came across Nelson’s story “about three months ago in an advance copy. I’m always sort of developing things and looking around. I also looked at a book of Blake’s called ‘Rock Star Superstar,’ but we didn’t go very far with it. The fact that this was set in Portland really got me.” Along with the French production company M2K, which has distributed some of his work in France, Van Sant acquired the rights this summer.

Van Sant has held open casting calls for other films, including the Cannes Film Festival winner “Elephant,” which he also shot in Portland, and “Last Days,” his elegaic portrait of a rock star’s death. In his recent movies, he’s often created scenes and plot lines in conjunction with his actors. But he says that the novel-based “Paranoid Park” has more of a familiar dramatic structure. “It’s kind of a hybrid of styles,” he says. “It’s a lot less open than the last couple of films. But it’s still pretty open.”

For starters, he explains, he has no idea who will portray the main character, a 16 year-old kid. So the first two casting sessions will be specifically geared toward finding that person; it could even be a girl. Prospective actors age 14-18, male or female, are encouraged to “just show up,” according to a spokesperson for the casting company. “You don’t have to have any experience, there are no requirements, and there’s nothing to do in advance.” These first casting sessions will be held from 1-8 p.m. Thursday, August 3, and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, August 5.

For the third casting session, which will be geared toward finding supporting cast, extras and, especially, skateboarders to fill out scenes, the age range expands from 14-30. That session will take place 1-8 p.m. Tuesday, August 15.

All casting sessions will be held at the Ambridge Event Center, 300 NE Multnomah St. Full information can be obtained by calling a hotline at 503-222-2462 or visiting http://www.myspace.com/paranoidpark.

So go on out and break a leg! Just, you know, not on your skateboard...

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-- Tip u zelenoj kosulji, lijevo od rezisera, je direktor fotografije Christopher Boyle.
On je, izmedjuostalog, zasluzan za izgled Kar-waiovog 2046.

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Post by repeater » 24/04/2007 04:04

The Man From London - Bela Taar (Mađarska/Francuska)

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Tarr (51) – who presented his Werckmeister Harmonies at the 2000 Cannes Directors’ Fortnight– will be making his first appearance in official competition at a major festival at Cannes.

The film is an adaptation of Georges Simenon’s novel L'homme de Londres. Featuring British actress Tilda Swinton, Czech actor Miroslav Krobot and Hungary’s Janos Derzsi and Istvan Lenart, The Man from London centres on Maloin, a simple switchman at a railway station who witnesses a murder and accidentally procures a suitcase full of money, which transforms his lonely existence but also brings him a fair share of problems.

A thriller undoubtedly transfigured by Tarr, who said he was drawn by the fusion of universal and very down-to-earth themes evoked in the novel.

Director's Statement --

If I have to say why I liked this story and why I decided to work with it, the answer has to be that it brings together the universal and the everyday. It's cosmic, but it focuses on the details of reality, it is divine and human. For me it involves a totality of Man and Nature – just as it involves their pettiness. I came to like Maloin…

Maloin: a man who lives simply, beside the endless sea and with no real perspectives, he is barely aware of the world around him, he has come to terms with his slow and constant isolation and loneliness. His contacts are narrowing, more and more automated; the best of them is with the gull he feeds everyday and which he tamed.

But when Maloin witnesses a murder, his life changes. He has to face moral questions: what is a crime and what is punishment, where is the line between innocence and complicity? The process of doubt leads him to question the meaning and value of life. Is there meaning and value?

Maloin comes through this, the greatest of tests. After committing the most serious crime, he may have lost his simple innocence but he has preserved his honesty.

Old and bold and creased by time, he finally becomes an adult.

But being adult and wise is too much for anyone who wishes to stay alive. He has earned dignity with great difficulty and that dignity can only be kept by a dignifying suicide.

His last strokes of the oars lead him back into the embrace of the eternal and endless sea.
Maloin's story is ours, personally speaking it is very much my story. It is intimate and personal, unfriendly and morose, just like the natural setting in which his story takes place.

The tone of the film becomes personal. Each frame will produce the way I see the world, in style I aim at a puritan simplicity, through which I can bring to life the complexity of Maloin's proletarian world, as authentically and as lovingly as I can.

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Post by repeater » 25/04/2007 01:28

My Blueberry Nights - Wong Kar-Wai (Kina/SAD)

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Studio Canal is proud to announce the selection of Wong Kar Wai’s first English language feature MY BLUEBERRY NIGHTS as the Opening Night Film of the 60th Cannes Film Festival on May 16th. The screening will be the World Premiere of the romantic drama starring Norah Jones, Jude Law, David Strathairn, Rachel Weisz and Natalie Portman. The selection marks the first time in Cannes’ history that a film by a Chinese director has kicked off the Festival.

Jeremy (Jude Law) runs a small café in New York. Every evening, Elizabeth (Norah Jones, in her acting debut) comes in and orders a slice of blueberry pie and gazes out the window. One night, she tells Jeremy her story: a man she thought she could never live without has left her.

After that, Elizabeth disappears. Jeremy discovers that she has left town and set off on a long journey towards a new beginning. Along the way, she befriends various people (David Strathairn, Rachel Weisz and Natalie Portman) with dilemmas of their own.

Shot across the United States in New York, Memphis, Nevada and along the legendary Route 66, the film is an intimate tale of love and self-discovery that features Wong’s trademark visual flair and colourful characters.

“It’s a great honour to be the first Chinese filmmaker to receive this coveted slot,” stated Wong Kar Wai. “I am delighted to return to Cannes this year and be part of the Opening Night festivities for its 60th anniversary.”

Wong Kar Wai is an award-winning writer/director whose unique style has influenced a generation of filmmakers. His acclaimed work includes the art house hits In the Mood for Love, Happy Together (which earned him the Best Director Award at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival), and Chungking Express and 2046.

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Post by repeater » 25/04/2007 06:47

No Country for Old Men - Ethan and Joel Coen (SAD)

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Following two broad comedies that many felt fell short of their own high standards (‘Intolerable Cruelty’, ‘The Ladykillers’), Joel and Ethan Coen are back with what might well be their bloodiest outing yet. Based on Cormac McCarthy’s terse literary thriller about a Texan Vietnam vet who stumbles into the crossfire of a gangland drug operation, it features many of the Coens’ abiding motifs – violence, manliness, quirky characters – but not their usual acting repertoire. Javier Bardem, Tommy Lee Jones and Woody Harrelson star.

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Post by repeater » 25/04/2007 07:06

Zodiac - David Fincher (SAD)
http://www.zodiacmovie.com/

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Post by harač » 25/04/2007 21:10

zanimaju me "No Country For Old Men," radi Coena i Cormaca kojeg volim i
"Zodiac", iako je on izašao odavno, a nisam ni pirata vidio da je izašao

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Post by repeater » 26/04/2007 06:32

The Cannes Film Festival's Directors' Fortnight slate is supposed to be announced on May 3rd, but Variety's Alison James is reporting now that the sidebar's opening-night pic will be Anton Corbin's Control, a biopic about the late Ian Curtis, the Joy Division singer who hanged himself at age 23. Bono, members of New Order and Depeche Mode will attend (and may perform at) the opening- night party on Friday, 5.17, following a gala screening of the black-and-white film.

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-- Curtis and child on May 13,. 1980 -- five days before he hung himself in his bedroom.

Filmed in black and white, this is based on (the widow of Ian Curtis) Deborah Curtis' Touching From a Distance, this is a biopic of Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. Matt Greenhalgh adapted the screenplay, which covers the last years in Curtis' life, leading up to his suicide on the eve of what was to have been Joy Division’s first US tour in 1980. Plot centers on Curtis' struggle between feeling enduring love for his wife and child and his beginning a burgeoning relationship with another woman a rock journalist, as well as his bouts with epilepsy and all-consuming performances with his band.

The Curtis suicide was dramatized in Michael Winterbottom's 24 Hour Party People, the well-received faux-doc. Control , however, is said to be a "totally different" film. Directors Fortnight honcho Olivier Pere told James that "it's a surprising love story about someone who was very ordinary and very modest...it's very close to English cinema from the 60s and 70s, with a political and social backdrop."

kadar iz filma --
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Post by repeater » 27/04/2007 03:34

Izgnanie (aka Banishment) - Andrey Zvyagintsev (Rusija)

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forspan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2YngCFu4j8

skroman forspan, ambijent u filmu me podsjeca na "crvenu pustinju" od antonionia. btw. rijec je o reditelju koji je par godina unazad sa svojim prvijencem "povratak" stekao ogroman ugled kod sineasta.
Last edited by repeater on 27/04/2007 07:14, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by repeater » 27/04/2007 07:10

harač wrote:zanimaju me "No Country For Old Men," radi Coena i Cormaca kojeg volim

saka slika sa seta, jos nista konkretno, svi su u velikom iscekivanju ...

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Post by repeater » 27/04/2007 07:12

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-- braca coen :D :D

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Post by repeater » 30/04/2007 06:36

Mogari No Mori - Naomi Kawase (Japan)

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Shigeki lives in a rather small and ordinary retirement home. He feels comfortable and happy here with the other residents and the gentle and caring hospital staff. Reiko, one of the home’s staff pays special attention to him. However, she is haunted by the loss of her child and tries to hide the guilt she feels over the separation with her husband. Today is Shigeki’s birthday. Reiko naturally asks him what he would like as a present; His foremost wish is to visit his wife’s grave one last time. Reiko agrees to help him and together, they make the long drive to the forest, then, the walk to where the cemetery is hidden by the trees, where Shigeki’s wife is resting in peace. It is in this peaceful place that Reiko discovers that Shigeki has been writing every day for 33 years to his beloved wife. It is time for him to write his last letter and Reiko will help him to reach his
mourning’s end.

zvanicana stranica: http://www.mogarinomori.com/

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Post by repeater » 30/04/2007 07:08

Breath - Ki-duk Kim (Juzna Koreja)

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Set report: Kim Ki-duk's Breath
Kim Ki-duk's eyes gleam with concentration as he surveys his actors taking their places for the final scene of Breath, the director's 14th film. It is a freezing cold day in Seoul and Kim is shooting in a former Japanese colonial prison where Korean independence movement fighters were once tortured in their cells.

Shot in just 10 days, Breath tells the story of a death-row inmate who falls in love with another man's wife. She has recently discovered her husband's infidelities, and is captivated by the prisoner, who has stabbed himself in the throat as he awaits execution.

Although lighter in content than some of the director's notorious films such as Bad Guy - which depicted a man kidnapping a woman he has fallen in love with and forcing her into prostitution - Breath's production nonetheless has been controversial, following Kim's disparaging public remarks back in August about local film-goers' tastes and Korean distribution.

He had declared he would stop making films in Korea if Time - his love story about cosmetic surgery that opened the Karlovy Vary film festival last year - did not see more than 200,000 admissions. The film clocked up only 30,000 ticket sales but Kim says he was satisfied enough with the release - which was handled by arthouse distributor Sponge - to continue making films.

Breath is notable for its cast, particularly Taiwanese heart-throb Chang Chen, whose credits include Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Hou Hsiao-hsien's Three Times. The star, who had previously expressed an interest in working with Kim, plays the silent inmate.

"This is the first time I've worked with a director who has such an unpredictable style," says Chang. "He has given me a challenging character that couldn't be put into words in a script, but he managed to gradually draw me into his cinematic world."

The film also reunites Kim with up-and-coming actor Ha Jung-woo, who starred in Time. "Working with director Kim is like being in a sports match," says Ha. "You can't predict what's going to happen and everything can change depending on the day's circumstances - the weather, the mood, the atmosphere."

Ha plays the wandering and neglectful husband to Park Ji-Ah, as his wife, who he eventually learns to take care of again. Park has worked with Kim on films including The Coast Guard.

Today, on set, she is singing a song of farewell to her imprisoned love as he embraces her, and is eventually wrested away by her husband and walked down the long corridor of the jail.

The elegiac feel of the scene is reminiscent of 3-Iron, which the director references when talking about the genesis of Breath. "I had a prison scene in 3-Iron which made me want to shoot a film set entirely in a prison. And I wanted to portray the breathing of this woman and these men, the steady inhaling and exhaling in the way of yin and yang, night and day."


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forspan: mms://mmc.daumcast.net/mmc/2/movie/trai ... 1_700k.wmv

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Post by repeater » 03/05/2007 08:26

Stellet Licht - Carlos Reygadas (Meksiko)

Set in the Mexican community of Mennonites, Reygadas portrays the struggle of married man Jakob who, against the laws of God and his people, falls in love with another woman. ** definitivno jedan od moji favorita.

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Post by repeater » 08/05/2007 03:06

Secret Sunshine - Lee Chang-dong (Juzna Koreja)

South Korea's No.2 at this years Cannes Film Festvial. After losing her husband, a woman relocates to a small-town called Miryang for a new start. When tragedy strikes, one local man stands by her through all of her struggles and tries to offer her hope.

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Post by repeater » 08/05/2007 08:21

Auf der anderen Seite - Fatih Akin (Njemacka)
http://www.corazon-int.de/EN/ADA.html
**definitivno razlog za veselje. prije ovog, gegen die wand (glavom kroz zid) je fantastican film i samo pet puta sam ga pogledao.
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Post by repeater » 11/05/2007 06:24

4 luni, 3 saptamani si 2 zile - Christian Mungiu (Rumunija)

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Post by repeater » 11/05/2007 06:24

New wave directors drive Romanian film renaissance
By Kathrin Lauer, dpa
http://eux.tv/article.aspx?articleId=7856

Bucharest (dpa) - Until recently, Romania was known for myths and horror stories about bedraggled children and the oppressive communist dictatorship.

But the latest member of the European Union also has a wealth of culture with ambitious and creative young artists that can soon be witnessed at the upcoming Cannes Film Festival.

Director Christian Mungiu's film 4 Luni, 3 Saptamini si 2 zile (4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days) is showing in competition this year for the coveted Palme d'Or, the first time a Romanian film has been in competition for 12 years.

The film marks Mungiu's emergence on the international big screen and tells a story of human drama typical of the latter years of the communist regime ousted in 1989.

A young female student has become pregnant with a child she does not want. Her friend helps her to organize an illegal abortion. The terror of the dictatorship reached even the most intimate spheres as then president Nicolas Ceausescu had banned not only abortions but all kinds of contraceptives so as to increase the number of his subjects.

Romania's many unwanted children, born after Ceausescu's birth decree in 1968, were ironically nicknamed "little decrees."

"I too am a 'little decree'," said Mungiu who was born in the same year in the city of Iasi, north-east Romania.

Apart from the unimaginable degradations experienced by the young women, Mungiu's film also paints a picture of Romanian customs in everyday life and the mentality of that era.

Mungiu, who is a graduate of the Bucharest Film Academy, deals consciously with that period.

"Many Romanians still yearn for those years simply because they were young then," he said.

This film is the start of a series called Tales from the Golden Age - a reference to communist propaganda before 1989 in which the Ceausescu regime promised everyone happiness and well-being.

Like his peers in the film industry, Mungiu had so far focussed on subjects of everyday life such as in his movie Occident in 2002 which highlighted the yearning for the West in post-communist Romania.

The comedy attracted 65,000 cinemagoers in Romania, becoming one of the country's most most popular productions. Such smash hits are a rarity as most native productions only run for two weeks at the most in Romania's cinemas.

Foreign films, especially those from Hollywood, dominate the market. Apart from Mungiu, two other Romanians will be present in Cannes this year, albeit one on a tragic note.

Cristian Nemescu's Esfarit (California Dreamin') which is showing in the category Un Certain Regard, died in a tragic car accident last August at the age of only 27. He was considered the great hope of young Romanian cinema with his international award-winning short films.

Another Romanian director, Catalin Mitulescu, will have his A Heart-Shaped Balloon screened in the Atelier section at Cannes. This category awards prizes not only to completed films, but offers a tailor-made accompaniment to both directors and producers to help finalize the financial assembly of their individual projects.

In 2004, Mitulescu won the Palme d'Or for his short film, Trafic - a drama about a young businessman who is stuck in a Bucharest traffic jam.

Mungiu, Mitulescu and Nemescu are characteristic of a generation of filmmakers who have had to battle tradition and the national bodies which hand out funds.

They fought constant battles with the National Centre for Cinematography (CNC) because they believed it gave old communist propaganda filmmakers such as Sergiu Nicolaescu so much money that there was nothing left for younger ones.

The ringleader of the protests against the CNC is Cristi Puiu, a young star director. His film, The Death of Mister Lazarescu (Moartea domnului Lazarescu), won the main prize in the section Un Certain Regard in 2005 and 14 other awards at smaller European festivals.

The last Romanian film to run in the main competition at Cannes was in 1995 when Mircea Danieliuc's Senatorul Melcilor was screened.

But the last big success story for Romania at Cannes was Liviu Ciulei's historic drama Padurea spanzuratilor (La foret des pendus) which dealt with Romania's role in World War I. Ciulei, now 83, won the best director award in Cannes that year.

Despite his success in Cannes, Ciulei went down in history as a revered icon of Romanian theatre. He stopped making films because of the communist censor and devoted himself to the stage not only in Bucharest, but in New York as well. He was also director of the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis for many years.

If the young Mungiu should win in Cannes, he will be measured against Ciulei at home.

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Post by repeater » 16/05/2007 08:32

i dok publika u kanu nestrpljivo ocekuje danasnju premijeru Wong Kar-wai filma "My Blueberry Nights" 'obicnoj raji' ne preostaje nista drugo vec da se hrani mrvama :D :D : http://www.allocine.fr/video/player_gen ... 11805.html

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